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Thread: How sensitive are they to sounds?

  1. #1
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    Default How sensitive are they to sounds?

    My little one is now 4 months old and since the first day together I have made a soothing clickling sound with my mouth whenever I gently "mess around" his tank (changing food etc) and also when I give him dubia.

    How sensitive and learning are they to these kind of sounds, does anyone know?

    It seems now that whenever I do this sound he peeks out from his hiding as saying "is it time for dubia dinner, yes, yes??". And he is on alert, staring straight at me, ready to attack the insect!
    And if there's no dubia he almost looks dissapointed, turn around and return to his hiding place.

    Is it really possible that they can connect sound and event / with food??

    I have another question regarding sounds. What happens if the neigbour is drilling in the wall or if there is a very high mashine repair sound, would that freak it out?

  2. #2
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    It may be possible to make a connection between sounds and natural responses, like sound. Loud noises and vibrations can cause stress. I have seen tail loss and signs of panic. Running rapidly and vocalizing are sure signs of the stress. If one gecko gets stressed it can cause a larger issue by stressing geckos in adjoining enclosures. This can cause wide spread tail loss that radiates out from the location of the impacted gecko.

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    Like Tom said, almost any animal can be trained to a point by sound or even light. Heck I have a friend who trained guppies to feed in a certain spot via a laser pointer. So it is certainly possible your gecko associates the sound with feeding. Pavlov tested that theory out in dogs and it was proven the dogs learned a certain sound triggered a feeding response.

    Some geckos have no issues with loud sounds, some do. I have known people to experience a bad thunder storm and the result was tail loss. Heck even Matt Parks (owner of Pangea) many moons ago experienced tail loss in some of his animals in a particular area with the introduction of a new shop vac being used. And sometimes they just drop it for what appears to be no apparent reason.
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    Certainly cresties are sensitive to sound -- they make sounds to communicate with each other.

    Sudden sounds can scare them but so can other things. They get used to normal household noises such as dishwashers, vacuum cleaners, and washing machines. I can't say that mine have ever demonstrated that they enjoy the sound of the blender, but they tolerate it.

    I also had 4 years of construction next door that vibrated everything, to the point that some plaster cracked. Sometimes my geckos would stare at me during the day as if the noise and vibrations were my fault. I felt bad, and I hated it, too, and we all survived.

    As to whether the geckos recognize voices and footsteps, I'd say that yes, they do. When I have guests they're a lot more hesitant to show themselves during daylight hours. Two of my geckos also will come to the front of their cages and jump on the mesh when I talk to them if they feel like coming out; these two enjoy being handled/exploring. (I always talk to them when I'm going to open their cages, whether it's to change their food or water dishes or for some other reason, so they associate my voice with hands in their cages, if not being handled).
    3.3.0 Correlophus ciliatus (crested geckos)

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    We live in a rural area, so for the most part it's very quiet here. When I use the vacuum, I start out in the farthest room from the gecko tanks and work my way closer. So far it hasn't seemed to bother them too much by doing it that way.
    Eileen
    TAD "Tiny Ancient Dinosaur" (Crestie), Hidey (Garg), O.G. "Office Gecko" (Bauer's Chameleon gecko), TBD "Tiny Badass Dragon" (Western Bearded Anole), 3.1.0
    Rody Jane (cattledog/stinkwad mix), Dixie Moonpie (rattledog) George P-Dog (lab/Great Pyr) 1.2.0, Ringer (barn cat) 1.0.0

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