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Anyone Deal With Red Worms?

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  • Anyone Deal With Red Worms?

    Theres a lady in my city who sells red worms for composting for super cheap. I've been talking with her about setting up a small colony to feed my new skink. I'd feed the worms as a staple and add variety with crickets, mealies and supers. Has anyone used red wigglers? I found these nutritional facts:


    Moisture- 84.8%
    Fat- 2.0%
    Ash-0.7%
    Protein- 10.5%

    Over-all they seem pretty good and because you control what they eat, they would always be gut-loaded and healthy and you could easily add calcium power to the food your giving them to increase those levels. Over-all they see like a really good staple for a fire skink. So has anyone else used them? I've heard reptiles can not like the taste of the red worms but this guy is super prey driven and a WC (almost 100% sure) so I get the feeling he's not going to be the picky type. Especially since he lived most of his life competing for food with bearded dragons....

    Anyways, tell me what you guys think!
    0.0.1 - Abel Gideon - Northern BTS
    1.0 - Timey Wimey - Crested Gecko
    1.0 - Sammy - Chahoua

    Oliver has found a new forever home

  • #2
    I also grow and sell composting worms. My fish are crazy for them but my cresties won't touch them. I have no idea what your skinks may like. Anyway, the worms aren't poisonous but their taste isn't appealing to all creatures.
    3.3.0 Correlophus ciliatus (crested geckos)

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    • #3
      Eisenia fetida (red wrigglers) secrete a yellow, bitter-tasting liquid when under duress, and are avoided because of such. Everything in the Eisenia genus does this, for example, Eisenia hortensis (European Nightcrawlers). In the newt/salamander hobby, the most common staple is Lumbricus terrestris (Canadian Nightcrawler). They are larger (but can be cut to size) and do not secrete anything. They cannot, however, be cultured easily, but are readily available as fishing bait.

      I wanted to culture my own worms, but in the States, Lumbricus rubellus (litter worms), prevalently used in Europe, was made illegal. In my research, I came upon Amynthas gracilis (Alabama Jumpers) and Eudrilus eugeniae (African Nightcrawlers) as possible culturable substitutes, but you would have to research the availability and viability of culturing in your area.

      (I added common and scientific names because common names are often different depending on where you go.)
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      • #4
        The seller also has albama jumpers available. I'll look in to their nutritional value and care.
        0.0.1 - Abel Gideon - Northern BTS
        1.0 - Timey Wimey - Crested Gecko
        1.0 - Sammy - Chahoua

        Oliver has found a new forever home

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