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Hmm... Possibility of a 'reverse' Dalmation?

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  • #16
    It seems like a raised scale trait. I wouldn't be surprised to see more of these.
    STEVEN

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    • #17
      i would hold off and breed that only to something with the same trait. a " Bling " or a "Cherrypie " offspring might be needed here for sure . good suggestion

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Spyral View Post
        I call them "fawn spots" because they remind me of the white spots on baby deer.
        Love it!

        Also... Just out of curiosity... why is it that the term Dalmation is used with black, red, and green spots, but wouldn't carry over if some other color of total-body spotting were 'created'? I understand the concept if it only applied to black spots, but why those three colors and not necessarily others (discounting oil spots, etc since those seem to be a variation of the aforementioned colors)? Is it that the spot has to be considered 'darker' than the base coat, or only different than the base coat?
        By 2030, a world where no reptile is abused, neglected, or viewed with prejudice.

        Website: http://www.partygecko.com
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        • #19
          OHH, faun spots! that is soo perfect. Yes I am trying for white spotted sides. I have a hand full of younguns with those white spots. what you should really do is just send it my way!
          Roxanne
          and the zoo
          www.geckoluv.com

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          • #20
            I thought there are white dal spots, but they are nothing like portholes or raised portholes. They are like the other colors of dal spots, just the pigment is different. But maybe I'm remembering wrong.

            I like the trait of raised white portholes/white side spots. Would it be related to the furry trait?
            *** My "N" key is actig up. Luckily, there's no "N" in "crested gecko" or "Rhacodactylus ciliatus".***

            2.3.9.12 cresties
            0.2 cats
            0.1 German Shepherd Dogs
            1.1.2 humans (that's 1 adult male, 1 adult female (me), and two male juvies)

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            • #21
              Originally posted by PartyGecko View Post
              Also... Just out of curiosity... why is it that the term Dalmation is used with black, red, and green spots, but wouldn't carry over if some other color of total-body spotting were 'created'? I understand the concept if it only applied to black spots, but why those three colors and not necessarily others (discounting oil spots, etc since those seem to be a variation of the aforementioned colors)? Is it that the spot has to be considered 'darker' than the base coat, or only different than the base coat?
              Portholes are portholes because they are raised white-colored scales. Spots, be they black, red or green, are not raised, but flat speckles, spots and patches of pigment that do not match the base color. If the portholes were across the body and were not raised, they'd be white spots. It's not that the spots have to be darker than the base color to be considered spots, it's simply what they are in comparison to other traits.
              ~Rami | Nova Reptiles | iHerp | Facebook
              7.17.6.7 Crested geckos, 1.1 mix leachies, 1.1 Halmaheras, 1.1 African Fat Tails, 1.2 Tokays, 1.1 Oedura castelnaui, 2.1 Leopard geckos, 0.1 corn snake, & too many feeder bugs.

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              • #22
                I have a guy with those. He is in one of my threads.

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                • #23
                  Well, after all of the hullabaloo about what to call these things, my husband and I took the loupe out to more closely examine the white spots on the side of "Lucky". He does have some raised scales in various areas across his sides - of both his base color and the white color, separate from the ones that run down his back. The white spots, however, do not appear to all be raised scales, nor do all of the white spots appear to have a raised scale within them. More on this as he grows out, and as I can get better photos for general examination.
                  By 2030, a world where no reptile is abused, neglected, or viewed with prejudice.

                  Website: http://www.partygecko.com
                  'Like' our facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/partygecko
                  Blog: http://ratsinthefreezer.blogspot.com/
                  Breeding Projects&More: http://www.iherp.com/partygecko

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                  • #24
                    I just wanted to sure a pic of my guy. I love all the pics on this thread. Beautiful geckos
                    He also has red and black Dal spots.



                    I personally think this looks awesome on cresteds. Best of luck to finding the name out.

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                    • #25
                      Hmm, Maybe your gecko has multiple traits going on. White walls are also a whitened non-raised scale pattern that can develop onto a geckos entire side. Its possible you have some of that going on which could easily mix in with the porthole trait or the white dots.

                      @ Jaygecko.... The photo you provided here is a much better representation of what this gecko is because it is fired up. In your other thread he was all grey and yoiu mentioned he was like that all the time so I figured patternless. Based on these photos that is incorrect and it appears here to be more of a bi-color which is unique in color. Really cool gecko! This is why it is important to morph a crested when it is fired-up.
                      STEVEN

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