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Most prolific geckos?

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  • #16
    Dang, I may be right but I was typing too fast and left out a whole syllable....
    "Nothing worth having comes without some kind of fight;
    You gotta kick at the darkness 'till it bleeds daylight....."
    --Bare Naked Ladies

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    • #17
      Has anyone worked with viper geckos? I was just tipped off to those as well and was told that they breed even faster than pictus. I don't want to exhaust any breeding feeder animals (I mean it's bad enough feeding off their offspring so I'd rather not kill them by breeding them to death :? ) so I'm trying to find the species that I can get the highest output from safely.
      -Marina York-


      4.3.1 Rhacodactylus ciliatus
      0.0.1 Rhacodactylus chahoua
      0.0.1 Rhacodactylus leachianus leachianus (B)
      1.0.0 ball python
      0.1.0 BCI
      0.2.0 leopard geckos

      Comment


      • #18
        Pachydactylus tigrinus, Tiger geckos are what you're looking for. I swear they're hatched gravid, even more prolific than pictus. Since you're feeding them to arboreal geckos, they make sense. Terrestrial geckos tend to hide at ground level or in holes. You'd probably be better off using a wall climbing type species that tends to climb up to escape, not into holes and under rocks. Tigers fit that nicely. Sub-adults would be about the right size for a sub-adult leachie, adults for adults.
        I had 2.8 at one time when I started, within less than a year I was knee deep in them (not to mention the ones behind the panelling in the herp room after a tank broke and they escaped
        If you can read this, thank a teacher.

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        • #19
          Thanks for the tip! I actually saw some available (I haven't seen any available pictus that weren't morphs) and they were much cheaper than I thought! I thought they'd run 50-100 a piece but they're very affordable. I'll have to research them a bit more.
          -Marina York-


          4.3.1 Rhacodactylus ciliatus
          0.0.1 Rhacodactylus chahoua
          0.0.1 Rhacodactylus leachianus leachianus (B)
          1.0.0 ball python
          0.1.0 BCI
          0.2.0 leopard geckos

          Comment


          • #20
            .Oh and is it easier to hatch and raise the tiger geckos than the pictus? Size and ease of care are a big factor here. I'm concerned about keeping the tiger gecko hatchlings alive and growing them out into adults. Can they take pinhead crix or do you need to start them on fruit flys? Thanks in advance
            -Marina York-


            4.3.1 Rhacodactylus ciliatus
            0.0.1 Rhacodactylus chahoua
            0.0.1 Rhacodactylus leachianus leachianus (B)
            1.0.0 ball python
            0.1.0 BCI
            0.2.0 leopard geckos

            Comment


            • #21
              They're easy care, nothing to it. I had them set up in a 'dry forest' type habitat, similar to what you'd do for fat-tailed geckos including a UTH since they hide during the day. Some people suggested sand but I used peatmoss, just a barely moistened enough to keep the dust down, but you could easily use coco-fibre. Provide some humid hides but don't look there for eggs - they'll be outside in drier substrate. That's probably where I went wrong at first - couldn't find eggs in the humid hide for ages even though the I saw mating and gravid females. Then one day I noticed all these tiny brown, spotted 'sticks' moving around and realized there were about 8 or 9 babies! They are communal if the enclosure is big enough, mine were in a 55 gallon tank. Males don't fight if there's enough room, babies weren't eaten (if they were, I wouldn't have noticed, still had dozens and dozens of the little suckers flitting around). You have to be really observant if you're looking for eggs, they're very small and hard shelled so they're rather fragile. I finally gave up saving eggs and let them hatch wherever they were laid. It worked, very well, too well
              Babies can take pinheads and they grow like weeds. Even though I ended up removing babies as soon as they were big enough to handle safely (within the first month), I never figured out just how old they have to be to mate. I tried removing suspected females from the baby tanks but some males made it in there anyways, guess they looked female long enough to be sorted in there. My guess is they are sexually mature by 4-5 months and full grown by then too. Eventually I had so many babies in with the adults that I didn't find and remove, that my 2.8 was more like a small village. Took some doing but I managed to set up 40-50 into 3 other tanks all within less than 2 years of getting the first ones, and that's when I sold the remaining 2.5 of the original group (females seem to lay themselves to death according to what I've been able to find in my research). Still had over 80 when I finally got out of tigers completely. If you're looking for feeders, they're the ideal species as far as I'm concerned.

              You really don't have to worry about them one bit. They're hardy as any gecko, moreso than pictus which I found to be a bit 'fragile' the first few weeks. Tiger babies are ready to tackle the world and capable of doing it too.
              If you can read this, thank a teacher.

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              • #22
                Thanks very much! I'm trying to find some adult tiger geckos to start breeding. They look like cute little guys but I'm sure I won't think so once they reproduce in mass numbers . Thanks again for your help .
                -Marina York-


                4.3.1 Rhacodactylus ciliatus
                0.0.1 Rhacodactylus chahoua
                0.0.1 Rhacodactylus leachianus leachianus (B)
                1.0.0 ball python
                0.1.0 BCI
                0.2.0 leopard geckos

                Comment

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