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aquatic plants + pond + siphon = ???

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  • aquatic plants + pond + siphon = ???

    Well, to make a long story short, i am seriously contemplating ripping out the pond I have now in my Exo-Terra and making another one in the front left corner (the one I currently have spands the whole length of the front). The pond I have now is just causing me so much grief...and I really don't like the way it looks.

    The one I might be making in the corner will be a lot smaller, therefore the filter i have now wouldn't be able to fit in it. I would need to clean the water somehow, so the only realistic way to do this without a filter is to siphon out the water weekly/bi-weekly (or whenever it get dirty).

    Well, here's the problem...i would really like to have java moss growing in the pond. I would then, after it gets settled and everything in the water, train it to take over the surrounding rocks and wood pieces. When I go to siphon out the water however, i'm not sure how it would affect the java moss. I really don't know if all of the siphoning would slowly be damaging it? Though I would put fresh water in very soon after taking the old water out, I don't know if this will harm the plant??? Java moss will most likely be the only aquatic in the pond.

    While typing this, it got me thinking. When the java does establish itself, wouldn't it be like a natural filter...or would the gecko waste be too much? If it was indeed a natural filter, I wouldn't have to siphon out the water at all would I?

    Any advice or kind words would be GREATLY appreciated. I'm just in a pickle right now...

    Thanks!
    Tyler

    Rhacodactylus ciliatus - 1.2.15.4
    Felis domesticus - 0.1.0

  • #2
    I think that as long as you'd fill the pond back up shortly, it should be ok. I would imagine that its habitat dries up periodically in nature, and since it's inmore of a primitive plant group, I'd imagine it's a little hardier than say, amazon sword. If you do worry about it, you can always dampen a paper towel to cover it while to pond refills.

    K
    Kaiden

    Insect protein-based gecko diet! 28% protein!
    Black Panther Zoological - also on Facebook

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    • #3
      Thanks!

      What about riccia? ...just incase I can't find java . I mean, i would fill up the pond...not even a couple minutes after draining it, so it's not like they wouldn't have water for hours on end. I was just wondering if all the siphoning every week would have long term effects. I'm sure I am just over analyzing this though.
      Tyler

      Rhacodactylus ciliatus - 1.2.15.4
      Felis domesticus - 0.1.0

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      • #4
        I don't see any problem with siphoning as long as you just sucked up the gunk from the bottom and only changed about 20% of the water at a time. The live plants need nutrients in the water to survive. If they don't have enough nutrients, they will die leaving a slimy mess for you to clean up.

        Have you thought about using a small sponge filter to get the bacterial filtration for the waste going? Sponge filters are pretty cheap and actually do a good job on the bacterial filtration. You would still have to siphon when solids built up on the bottom but the sponge only needs cleaned out once in a while (squeezed out a couple of times in the siphoned water to remove the solid wastes trapped in the sponge and allow the beneficial bacteria to stay and be built back up quickly then reinserted in your pond). An air pump is all that is needed to run a sponge or even a little corner filter.

        Look at some of the sponge filters or other filters on BigAl'sOnline. I have ordered from them before and received excellent service.
        http://www.bigalsonline.com

        Mary Ann
        Mary Ann
        Mom to 3 boys, Wife to a wonderful husband (who tolerates my zoo)
        0.1 Albino Checkered Garter, 0.1 Red Eared Slider, 1.3.2 very fast feeder fish, 3.3.14.10 Crested Geckos, 0.4.4 Mourning Geckos, 0.1.0 Gargoyle Gecko, 0.0.1 Leachianus Henkeli Gecko, 2.0 Bearded Dragons, 1.1 Bichons Frises, 1.0 Parakeet

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        • #5
          What if I just let the moss do it's own thing and get rooted (or...floated?...) and let it spread a little; would that then provide natural filtration? Would that take care of all the waste by itself, or would I still need something else to clean it?

          I'm honestly sick and tired of filters of all kinds-hehe. After having bad experiences with a couple different kinds lately (too big, didn't work the way I planned it to, too complex, etc), I would really just want siphoning / picking out the bigger pieces od debris by hand to be the only method of cleaning this thing...besides the natural filtration.

          I'm actually thinking about nixing the whole "water feature" thing all together and replacing the "water feature" with just a hollowed out coconut shell or something similiar. Honestly, the only thing putting me off from doing this is that I would imagine it would be hard taking the thing out every couple days and cleaning it and putting it back in...

          I just don't know what to do. I went from wanting a waterfall to almost nixing the whole water thing all together-hehe.
          Tyler

          Rhacodactylus ciliatus - 1.2.15.4
          Felis domesticus - 0.1.0

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          • #6
            I guess, the problem is that you might end up with some smell and possibly stagnant water without water movement and filtration. If you are siphoning weekly and changing out 20% with fresh, you should be able to have a small water feature without a filter. The live plants will convert some of the waste to oxygen and new plant growth. If a 20% change left you with a noticable smell from the water then up the percentage changed to 30% or change more frequently, whatever it took to make it livable for your environment. If you aren't keeping fish in the water then you really don't 'have' to have filtration since the water quality doesn't have to be kept stable. A betta fish would probably really like your pond since they can survive the little cups in walmart for a week.

            I have kept 3 platy fish in a 2 gallon pretzle jug with a small sponge filter and Java ferns on my desk when I worked full time. I only did water changes once a month, and rinsed out the sponge filter at that time. I know that the sponge filter does a good job if it can handle 3 fish in a 2 gallon jar with only monthly water changes. (about 50% changed) The sponge filters can be hidden pretty well too with only an airline tube to hide. You have to listen to the buzz of the air pump though if it isn't one of those super quiet ones.

            Good luck with your pond.
            Mary Ann
            Mom to 3 boys, Wife to a wonderful husband (who tolerates my zoo)
            0.1 Albino Checkered Garter, 0.1 Red Eared Slider, 1.3.2 very fast feeder fish, 3.3.14.10 Crested Geckos, 0.4.4 Mourning Geckos, 0.1.0 Gargoyle Gecko, 0.0.1 Leachianus Henkeli Gecko, 2.0 Bearded Dragons, 1.1 Bichons Frises, 1.0 Parakeet

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            • #7
              Yeah...i'm going to scrap the whole water feature thing as an 18x18x24 inch viv isn't big to begin with...plus the drainage and substrate, which takes up a lot of space. I bought a half coconut...shell thing for a nice natural water dish. This will be submerged into the substrate so that it is almost even with the ground. I will then use a turkey baster (well, it was the only small, portable thing to do the job-hehe) to suck out the water when it gets soiled. I'll then pour very hot water into it to clean it, then fill it back up with fresh water. It will be much easier this way, as I don't want to keep taking it in and out.
              Tyler

              Rhacodactylus ciliatus - 1.2.15.4
              Felis domesticus - 0.1.0

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