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Had my first encounter with a Leachie yesterday!

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  • #16
    Here some of our beautiful leachies, these are all pine island, and one Nu Ana Moro cross. They're so fun to keep and especially to handle. Great geckos
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    Geckos and what not! Facebook.com/greenwoodgeckos

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    • #17
      on my wish list too

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      • #18
        here's a few pics of my male nuu ami

        he was eight grams and a month old when i bought him





        some pics from summer when he around 10 months old and 50 grams



        0.1 R. Ciliatus- Sandy
        1.0 R. Leachianus- Sativa (Nuu Ami)
        1.0 DLH Cat- Diesel
        0.1 Nova Scotia Duck Toller (Coming home soon)

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        • #19
          Good luck, I hope you get one! They're awesome geckos - with all the stickiness of cresties and the regenerative abilities of gargs. :P I've really enjoyed my leachie so far. He's not even close to being as defensive as many people claim - as long as I take him away from the comfort zone of his tank and pick him up from beneath his pelvic area (rather than near his head) he cooperates. Their sharp nails are an unpleasant experience every time they walk on your skin, but other than that, they're a blast. And the squeaking noises are adorable, you totally don't expect that kind of sound to come from such a big, beefy gecko LOL.

          This is my boy, a 100% GT type B:
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          • #20
            Good to hear someone else has a well tempered leachie!
            My Mt.Koghis X Yate mix is completely tame.
            She never protests no matter how i retrieve her from her cage.
            it actually takes quite a bit of handling before she even tries to give me her little slight whistles of agitation.
            She is always proped up on her bark right near the front of the cage when i come home from work

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            • #21
              WOW! everyone has such beautiful geckos!! its making me want one even more haha! i didn't know they were so vocal lol. how incredibly adorable of them!
              https://www.facebook.com/vicky.theisen

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              • #22
                Check out my iHerp, I have a few. They are my favorites.

                Locality and lines can be very confusing for leachies. They used to be broken up into 3 separate subspecies R. l. leachianus, R. l. henkeli, and R. l. aubrianus. Leachianus were Grande Terre animals, henkeli were offshore island animals. Aubrianus were only collected a couple of times and then the specimens were lost in a fire at a museum. Given what is known about the variation of the leachies it is doubtful that "Aubrianus" was actually much more than a particular locale.

                A basic breakdown:

                Grande Terre (GT) tend to be the largest but tend to lack coloration and pattern. Depending on who you ask you will be told type A, type B, type C, and Mt. Khogis or a number of localities including Poindime, Yate, Mt. Khogis, Mt. Humboldt, and Riviere Bleu. Type A's roughly correspond to the northern end of the island, type C's to the very south, and type B's are actually a European line that has an unknown original locality. Which ones are largest is kinda a toss up (I hear type A's and Mt. Khogis outcrosses most often), except type C's tend to be smaller, with some of the offshore island features.

                The offshore island locales tend to be smaller, more highly patterned and colorful. A quick list of localities are Moro (common), Nuu Ana (common), Nuu Ami, and Pine Island (relatively common), then others that are much less common such as Duu Ana, Brosse, Bayonnaise, and Canaawa. The letters you sometimes see were an effort by early collectors and scientists (sometimes both) to hide the exact locations from poachers and smugglers. However, the locations have since come out and I am not sure why the letters persist. The only ones I know by memory are E being Moro, D being Duu Ana, and K being Canaawa. In general Nuu Ana's are smallest, and P.I.'s are the largest. Nuu Ana's can be highly patterned and colorful. Others can be very beautiful as well. I like Nuu Ami snowflakes (high pattern Nuu Ami... not really a morph in my mind) and Bayonnaise the best.

                Mixes are VERY common. What you get is a crapshoot if you buy before pattern starts to develop and size is not guaranteed. Someone might say a GT/island mix will have all the pattern and size; and I don't suggest believing it. If you want size I would look at GT A or B crossed with Mt. Khogis. For color, there are unknown locale lines such that have spectacular pinks and whites and such. Pretty awesome. One thing to remember is that unless you are buying from a few select breeders, the locale is doubtful in my mind. For example, there seem to be Nuu Ana's everywhere; however both Cemelli and de Vosjoli have told me that Nuu Ana's are not an easy locale to breed. Is it me, or does something smell fishy? I am not knocking mixes! Those are most of mine and they are every bit as good a gecko, and some are prettier on the whole to my eye.

                There are a few true morphs to my mind, but not many. There are a few GT animals who show a degree of melanism and are VERY dark. On the flip there are some that are extremely pale. Both source from Mt. Khogis if I remember right. There is also a mix line of high pinks or pinkies. Realistically, these are the only morphs I would recognize as such.
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                • #23
                  I am very curious about the future of leachies in herpetoculture.
                  As Tiger mentions, Local specific leachies are very popular now even though few breeders can offer truly confident collection localities.
                  I find that beautiful animals are beautiful animals and i am happy to cross leachies to obtain new and interesting color/size combinations like we do with morphs for cresteds. I just wonder if leachies are heading that way, in that soon locals wont be as important as say "high pinks" and "snowflake" type morphs. I am hoping to one day get a large dark Mt.Khogis type body with snowflakes but it will be at least two years before my little colorful He/She is ready to breed. What are your thoughts?

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by RDCOOPER View Post
                    I am very curious about the future of leachies in herpetoculture.
                    As Tiger mentions, Local specific leachies are very popular now even though few breeders can offer truly confident collection localities.
                    I find that beautiful animals are beautiful animals and i am happy to cross leachies to obtain new and interesting color/size combinations like we do with morphs for cresteds. I just wonder if leachies are heading that way, in that soon locals wont be as important as say "high pinks" and "snowflake" type morphs. I am hoping to one day get a large dark Mt.Khogis type body with snowflakes but it will be at least two years before my little colorful He/She is ready to breed. What are your thoughts?
                    I don't know that we will head there fully. I do believe that more morphs will be developed, though as seen in the other rhacs it might be limited what can be achieved; but the locales will never go away, unless they have such a limited distribution that they are lost just by attrition.

                    For example I will point to red-tail boas, chondros, and panther chameleons. All of these are found in pure forms and mixes. Mixes have been bred for specific traits (salmon boas, canary chondros, crazy a** panthers). Some of these command a high price, but a pure locality carries a solid price generally and has a certain cachet in my eyes at least.

                    However, certain localities being lost is a very real possibility. If I recall right, I believe Cemelli told me that "sure thing" Duu Anas almost don't exist in captivity. Canaawa is another locality that there are very few representatives of. Some of the offshore locales might even be extinct in the wild due to invasive ants, so if they are lost.... that's it. You see this with some of the Uromastyx species. These aren't a perfect example of course, but there are several species that were common in captivity and then due to unfortunate events, importation being shut down (which has already happened for Rhacs), and overall difficulty of obtaining more specimens, they are no longer available.
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                    • #25
                      You can check out pics of my guy on my iherp.
                      http://iherp.com/Public/Animals/View...AnimalID=38391

                      I seen my first one at a reptile show in cleveland. The lady had one just sitting out on display. I fell for those feet and that big derpy face. It took me two years but I finnaly had one. My gram scale is broken currently but i'm guessing hes around 200 grams now. He was just 10 grams when I got him. Theres all kinds of progress photos on my iherp. I hope to one day own anouther one. I don't really have any intentions of breeding but it would be cool it have two diffrent locales.

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                      • #26
                        Something that always fascinates me is how they can still cling so well to glass, despite their beefiness. :P
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                        I got really lucky with mine - I was doing an internship at a zoo and one of the keepers was looking to sell his personal leachie, and so I got my 4-year-old GT male for a mere $400. Pretty awesome, considering I just saw hatchlings at my last expo being sold for $500, haha. It's so great to know people when it comes to herps.

                        I wonder how often you find mellow leachies. I just took mine to the vet the other day, and they were grabbing him, sticking things in his mouth, and basically just harassing him (but in a good way lol), and yet he never once croaked at them or threatened to bite. I love my boy. <3

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                        • #27
                          I've been in love with leachies for a year now and finally pulled the trigger and bought a gtx isle e cross! Hes a little one at 13 grams and arrives next week I'm super excited!

                          Sent from my SGH-I727R using Tapatalk 2

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