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  • Stupid question

    I've been looking for the answer for a while but I can't find anything on it. Does anyone know why cresties have the little white spikes on their butts? They're just kinda there and it confuses me. Don't get me wrong I love my babies the way they are, but its just one of those question when you ask mother nature why?
    Kitten

  • #2
    They all have the little spurs. It is a thought that a males are larger and may assist in the breeding process.

    Rachodactylus Ciliatus

    2.2.5.2
    MUNKEY, PEACHES, MORROW, THIMBLE, KILI, GOLLUM, FALCOR, CHEECH & VALENTINE

    Rachodactylus Auriculatus
    1.2.1 KEKO, ARRO, PEBBLES & FALCOR

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    • #3
      Here, let me just spine my mate into breeding with me ... xD

      Anyway, I've always wondered why as well. It's actually pretty neat in a weird way that they have spines on both sides of their vents.

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      • #4
        Those spines aren't hard. They're actually called "cloacal spurs." They are present in all geckos to varying degrees.

        They seem to be one of those things that does not serve a purpose (to our knowledge -- the geckos may think otherwise! They may be sexy!) They may have served a purpose in ancestral geckos, a purpose that is now lost, or they may be tied genetically to something else that's important and just be "along for the ride."

        Anyway, they're natural, and it's good that you think they're kind of cool.
        3.3.0 Correlophus ciliatus (crested geckos)

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        • #5
          I heard from somewhere that they are used to help the guy geckos line themselves up correctly when they are getting ready to bump uglies lol

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          • #6
            Originally posted by bbyFrancis View Post
            I heard from somewhere that they are used to help the guy geckos line themselves up correctly when they are getting ready to bump uglies lol
            People keep repeating that, but I have not seen any evidence for it. I think it might be true in some snake species and possibly even in other gecko species, but it doesn't seem to be true in crested geckos.
            3.3.0 Correlophus ciliatus (crested geckos)

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Treebiscuit View Post
              People keep repeating that, but I have not seen any evidence for it. I think it might be true in some snake species and possibly even in other gecko species, but it doesn't seem to be true in crested geckos.
              I thought it seemed a bit of a guess tbh seeing as they aren't exactly the most accurate at anything let alone breeding lol clumsy little bugs.

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              • #8
                No idea why they have the spurs or why some geckos are so bumpy in general. Fun fact: the spurs are also known as "postcloacal tubercles".
                Specializing in Crested Geckos
                Working with Uromastyx | Uroplatus | PI Chahoua
                Also keeping: Australian Shepherds (Chester & Sadie)
                Moon Valley Reptiles | MVR @iherp | Facebook

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                • #9
                  Hee hee... "Tubercles."
                  Before you criticize someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticize them, you're a mile away and you have their shoes.

                  3.3 crested geckos: Turkish, Sollux, Pyx, Buttercup, Dandelion, and Jem.

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                  • #10
                    Many reptiles besides Cresties have them, I believe it's to help hook them on to their mate when breeding.

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                    • #11
                      We probably need a scientist to get a good answer. It could relate to mating as in alignment, etc. It could just be a now useless thing like our tail bones were we no longer have a use for them but still have them. I don't really have any idea.

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                      • #12
                        Even in snakes, the spurs are still uncertain as to purpose. It seems that they are vestigial, leftover from evolution from lizards. It's paralleled in some legless lizards. The evidence I can find online is very unclear, with assertions that the spurs don't connect to bone structures, but they clearly do in at least some species according to the picture on Wikipedia.

                        It seems they are present on "primitive" species like boas and pythons and are absent on most of the total snake species. It's actually a defining feature of primitive snakes. So either this is a special branch of snakes that just didn't revert to full leglessnesss, or perhaps this particular branch has found a use for it that is not needed in the other snakes. They do seem to be used in courtship, but it's also likely they help these animals adapt to arboreal life, or possibly courtship in arboreal environment. I'm not well-informed on snake mating habits.

                        Source: http://stacybdevo.blogspot.com/2013/...revisited.html

                        As for geckos, I'm not sure these are connected to any bones at all. Spurs are found in many species of gecko, and are absent in some species within related genera. Without doing a whole lot of digging into gecko taxonomy & species identification checklists, it's hard to say if there is anything about the post-cloacal tubercles that makes them similar to snakes or even within Gekkota. Would be a great topic to explore if one were doing a thesis in a herpetology program.
                        Specializing in Crested Geckos
                        Working with Uromastyx | Uroplatus | PI Chahoua
                        Also keeping: Australian Shepherds (Chester & Sadie)
                        Moon Valley Reptiles | MVR @iherp | Facebook

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