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  • New gecko not eating

    Hi, I'm looking for any advice on this I can get. We looked at several types of geckos before we got a crested gecko. I wanted something that almost assuredly would not bite my kids and didn't require lamps. We gave him 2 days to settle in and are still keeping handling sessions short. I have not seen him eat much of the crested gecko diet although I have seen evidence he touched it and he has pooped several times. The temp in the tub was getting a little low so I decided to put a heating pad on the side of the tub to raise the temp a few degrees. I purchased a thermostat and I cut a piece of cardboard to cover the surface on the inside of where the heating pad is. I set the thermostat to 80* F and placed the probe right on the inside of the tank where the pad is. That night I noticed the gecko started moving over toward the pad and has since spent all his time right on the pad. Tonight when I went to do the nightly spray and food change I offered him a dap of cgd on a plastic knife and he snapped at the knife! My gf went to do the same not believing me and he did it again! Whats wrong with him? He was so docile just 2 xyas ago?

  • #2
    If he's pooping, don't worry that you don't see him eating. I have had crested geckos that never seemed to be eating but they have thrived. I have found some of my crested geckos to have a Dr. Jekyl/Mr. Hyde personality --sweet and docile some days and aggressive and obnoxious other days. Here's a Gecko Time article about one of my crested geckos who has been so low key and docile the last few weeks that I'm actually worried about him: http://www.geckotime.com/big-bad-bart/

    Aliza

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    • #3
      Ok thanks, we've had him 10 days but its been 3 since ive seen poop. How long before I should be concerned that hes not eating? Also, I moved the food from the ground of the tub to a ledge yesterday. He wont go onto the ledge yet. Is it normal for them to struggle to find the food for a few days after you move it?

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      • #4
        The gecko snapping at the knife is something I interpret as a hunting behaviour. With added heat his metabolism goes up and he will be more active and more hungry. The knife moving infront of him most likely triggered him the same way an insect would.
        From what I've learned about cresties, they leave a scent trail for themselves to find their way and they quickly learn where they can find food. So when you move it, yes it'll take him a few days to realize this.
        You don't mention how old/what weight he is at. it is very common for them to change behaviour and personality as they grow.

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        • #5
          Sometimes they don't eat for weeks after a change in environment. Your gecko is normal. Keep the food available, and he will find it and eat when he gets hungry enough. Warmth (to a safe degree) will make them more active, and thus more hungry. And maybe a little more jumpy toward you.
          Eileen
          TAD "Tiny Ancient Dinosaur" (Crestie), Hidey (Garg), O.G. "Office Gecko" (Bauer's Chameleon gecko), TBD "Tiny Badass Dragon" (Western Bearded Anole), 3.1.0
          Rody Jane (cattledog/stinkwad mix), Dixie Moonpie (rattledog) George P-Dog (lab/Great Pyr) 1.2.0, Ringer (barn cat) 1.0.0

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          • #6
            Thank you all, btw he is approx 4mo old and I'm not sure on the weight bc we havent weighed him yet. Before getting him I did a lot of research about them. I found many things that said if you are giving a complete diet supplement that insects are not necessary. Is this really the case? My preference would be not to feed insects, but only for convenience reasons. I bought him at a pet shop because he was very robust and healthy looking so I decided it was ok. I'm guessing he mainly ate insects at the shop because the cgd was offered in a bowl nowhere near the safety of the artificial foliage. Do I need to offer some insects every week during transition to just the cgd? If so, I know leopard geckos can eat mealworms. Again, for purely convenience reason this would be my preference, but I can very easily go get crickets from the local shop if this isnt ok.

            Thanks again for all your help!

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            • #7
              I have had my crestie for 12 months. I do not feed insects. He had been feed insects by the breeder I purchased from, but he never seemed to want them when I fed them. I feed him Pangea GCD only. When I got him he was 15 months old and weighed 30 grams. Today he is 58 grams and thriving. He is healthy, very active and friendly. So, my experience is that insects are are not a must.

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              • #8
                I only feed insects about once a month. I’m not huge into them either. But when I throw them in with the geckos, even in daytime, most of them usually go after them right away. They have a great feeding response to them for sure. But like I said I’m not huge into insects. Crickets are dirty and smell and I’ve heard mealworms aren’t great for crested geckos. I’ll do wax worms once in a great while but mine don’t seem as interested in wax worms as crickets. And I’ve never seen my gold dust day gecko eat crickets, but I put like 8 small ones in and I never see them again so he must be eating them?

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                • #9
                  They are not necessary, but you can use them for enrichment. Dubia roaches are probably the best feeder insects if they are legal where you live. They don't smell, don't climb, don't make noise, and when dusted and gutloaded are very nutritious for your gecko.
                  Eileen
                  TAD "Tiny Ancient Dinosaur" (Crestie), Hidey (Garg), O.G. "Office Gecko" (Bauer's Chameleon gecko), TBD "Tiny Badass Dragon" (Western Bearded Anole), 3.1.0
                  Rody Jane (cattledog/stinkwad mix), Dixie Moonpie (rattledog) George P-Dog (lab/Great Pyr) 1.2.0, Ringer (barn cat) 1.0.0

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                  • #10
                    I would strongly recommend that you end up getting a lamp, or some sort of light source so they have a day and night schedule plus the heat. they don't need UVB but heat is defiantly recommended, especially with winter coming along if it is below 70 from my experience they don't eat as much as usual, and I would stop the handling sessions for a few weeks so he/she can get used to his new home. sometimes stress can stop them from eating as well. Sometimes crested geckos are picky about the food, mine will only regularly eat Pangea apricot. I also feed them crickets once every few weeks for enrichment. Mealworms work too but you have to keep them in the fridge so they won't turn into beetles. however, if he/she is pooing or sheading he/she is eating and growing.

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                    • #11
                      Pangea has cgd with insects in them and I think repashy does too. If you don't want to give live insects I recommend to use these. A study of wild geckos showed their stomach content to be nearly 50% insects. I would still recommend giving live at least now and again for stimulation. Dubia roaches are great as they can't climb on smooth surfaces, don't smell and won't bite your gecko if they are left in the cage uneaten, something crickets can do.

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                      • #12
                        ***UPDATE*** over the last week I have seen multiple clear evidence he is now eating the cgd and pooping. I'm super relieved!

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