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    What is the most common reason for a crested's tail to fall off? Do they ever fall off if they get too stressed from handling?
    1.0.1 crested geckos, 1.0 ball python, 1.0 paint horse, 1.0 rat terrier, 0.1 maine coon, 0.1 mutt kitty

  • #2
    from what i understand stress is a big factor. but handling them should not be that stressful to them.
    http://img359.imageshack.us/img359/7...fbba61fvt1.gif
    www.world-reptiles.com

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    • #3
      Improper Handling would probably be the main case. But one of mine mistakened his tail for a cricket and ate it But they also lose them during breeding sometimes.
      Derek Dunlop
      DDReptiles
      www.DDReptiles.net
      Croc's Rule- Steve Irwin

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      • #4
        Environment can be another cause I believe. The geckos tail can be caught in-between branches and lose it attempting to get out.

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        • #5
          alot of cresteds lose their tail in the first for months after hatching because they are handled to much.
          Josh
          1.0 cresties (zeus)

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          • #6
            I've had one female crested lose a tail during breeding (it doesn't happen often at all) and one subadult female lose a tail when a cricket jumped on her back. Yeah, that one was really weird... but she's calmed down since. Her tail has slightly regenerated and she looks hysterical. I fully expected her to just have a frog-butt like everyone else who drops a tail... but her stump kept growing and growing and now there's a mini tail. Goofy.
            ~Sarah~
            www.CrestedLady.com

            "This is your life, are you who you want to be?" -Switchfoot

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            • #7
              The main causes are social stress from other geckos, and improper handling techniques. But there are other rather odd reasons they fall off.
              Listen to them. Children of the night. What music they make. ---Count Dracula

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              • #8
                yea, when they're hatchlings they should only be handled when necessary. there is a common misconception of handling early ages will make them get use to it later ages.. but this is totaly false and should only handle hatchligns when necessary

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                • #9
                  I think they have to be at least 3 inches snout to vent.
                  Listen to them. Children of the night. What music they make. ---Count Dracula

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                  • #10
                    Ours lost her tail thanks to a rather desperate encounter with the cat. We were in a hurry and trying to feed our gecko, dropped a cricket, realized we were late and ran out. Long story short, Esti jumped 3ft out the cage door, landed on the floor and headed for our bed room. Unfortunately our cat lives in the house and is also very interested in geckos...

                    When we got home the cat was acting strangely, staring up frantically at a section of our wall paper. I turned on the light and saw what I thought was a bat hiding in the corner! Then I stepped on a small tail, realized it was Esti and we were able to mentally reenact what happened. Boy did we feel awful for not shutting the door. While we never forgot before, I imagine from now on we'll be doubly sure not to.

                    However, this brings up the other reason that geckos drop their tails, which is to distract predators while they get away. Poor Esti, but at least it worked! I'd much have a slightly shorter pet than an eaten one.

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                    • #11
                      that gecko must be traumatized.. it must liek run away right away when the cat passes the enclosure or seomthing.. maybe even when u try to handle it

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