Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Afican fat Tail! Im so confused!

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Afican fat Tail! Im so confused!

    Hey everyone!

    Here is the scoop! Im really confused on care for african fat tail geckos.
    I currently have purchased
    a Exoterra medium low tank. Size 24 inch long by 18 inch wide, by 12 inches high.
    Rep-cal calcium with vitamin D, I was also going to purchase the multivitamin powder as well
    Zoo med heating pad
    Water dish
    2 Hides
    Worm dish
    (Possibly might get a waterfall for funsies)

    Im confused on substrate.
    Some say echo earth, some say not to because it will grow bacteria, some say tile? some say paper towels. What the heck is vivarium soil?
    My goal with this tank is to have some live plants for him, a tank where he will be happy. I have lots of driftwood on hand (im a fishkeeper too!)
    I had a leo in the past. I would get another but, it still hurts a little because I had him a long time. So I thought id try an african fat tail.
    Im also worried he will eat the substrate or tunnel under things and have it collapse on him.

    Does anyone have a live planted african fat tail enclosure?

  • #2
    I have 2 planted AFT enclosures (not to mention a bunch of crestie, gargoyle, day gecko enclosures, as well as a planted enclosure for E. hardwickii which is more closely related to leos but looks more like an AFT. I even have a non-planted bioactive enclosure for 2 leos). I've had one of the fat tail enclosure for 10 years, I think. It's eco-earth with a drainage layer. I'll post a picture of it below as it looked when I first got it; it's changed a bit since then. I've never had a problem with impaction or tunneling (except for one enclosure where the females like to tunnel under the fake bonsai and often lay their eggs there --not a problem). Many people prefer not to use particle substrate for any gecko and AFT's can do well on the hard substrates, but I also prefer planted enclosures, so I do it this way.



    Aliza

    Comment


    • #3
      Please. I would really like a planted, nice looking tank. I know when its more natural, the inhabitants are more happy. I really like the look of eco earth type stuff. I would love to see your drainage layer and how you heat your tank. I was planning the usual heatpad under the tank. What do you feed? I was planning mealworms and crickets. Anything else ypu think I need?

      Comment


      • #4
        I was also thinking on just usings pots plugged into the substrate. Fill pots with organic miracle gro, then put a plant into the pot and place into the substrate. That way less chance s/he will nibble the soil.

        Comment


        • #5
          You can do pots as well. Here's how I do it: The drainage layer, which is standard for planted tanks, consists of 2-3" of expanded clay balls (hydroton, available at hydroponics stores), a layer of screen mesh (available by the roll at home improvement stores) cut to fit on top, and then 3-4" of eco earth o top of that. The problem has been, of course, how to heat that. Initially, I did the drainage layer for only 2/3 of the tank and then put a piece of plexiglass to separate the part with the drainage layer from the heated section, which has eco earth only. You can see that in the picture above. The eco earth is a fine heat conductor. In later enclosures, I would wrap the mesh layer around the hydroton to hold it together, but I kept getting topsoil cascading into the hide area. Now I'm kind of back to the initial plan and am putting some smaller ceramic tiles as a kind of barrier to keep the soil from drifting "downhill" into the hides.

          Aliza

          Comment


          • #6
            Wow. Maybe I might need to do a repticarpet to begin with. I haven't done something like this before. Can you post a side view of the tank? I might get a better idea. Please?

            Comment


            • #7
              I tried several times to take a picture of the enclosure, but they just don't come out because of the lighting and the glass. Here's a description that may help. You will need: expanded clay balls, screen mesh, coco fiber, plexiglass (I've already described where to get most of this):
              1. cut a piece of mesh the size of the tank width and twice the length. Lay it on the bottom of the (empty) tank. The UTH should already be installed on one side of the bottom (outside the tank)
              2. put the expanded clay balls in 2/3 of the tank to a 2-3" depth. The balls will start to roll around to cover the whole bottom of the tank, but to prevent this, take the free end of the mesh and wrap it back around the balls (you're going to sandwich the balls between the layers of mesh to keep them in the cool 2/3rds of the tank. Tuck the mesh into the far end of the tank and cut off a bit if it's too long
              3. cut a piece of plexiglass about 5"high and the exact width of the tank (many home improvement places will cut your plexiglass if you give them the measurements). Put it in the tank just to one side of the mesh and clay balls. There should be mesh and clay balls on one side of the plexiglass and nothing on the other side where the UTH is. You can see this piece of plexiglass in my photo.
              4. Put coco fiber on top of the clay balls to about a 3-4" depth. Put coco fiber on top of where the UTH is a few inches deep.

              I hope that's clearer.

              Aliza

              Comment


              • #8
                I have a little more time. I went to look at geckos and none seemed to give me the feeling of this is my buddy. I have a juvi on order for next friday and im hopeful. �� Im having a devil of a time finding clay balls and mesh. So i will have to order in. Cant wait to post pics

                Comment

                Working...
                X