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is a 121218 big enough for a baby chameleon

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  • is a 121218 big enough for a baby chameleon

    Hi I was thinking about getting a baby chameleon. I was wanting to know if an 121218 exo terra or zoo med terrium would be big enough to start out with then move to a screen cage once it is old enough. All thoughts n answers welcome thank you.
    Crested geckos 4:5:15
    Chewie. 0:1:1

    http://www.facebook.com/cjgeckos

  • #2
    No, definitely not, and glass will cause a respiratory infection in your cham even if you keep it there only a short while. Chameleons need SCREEN ONLY enclosures and are extremely difficult to care for properly.

    Please check out chameleonforums.com and read everything you possibly can on there before purchasing any chameleon. I have kept and bred them for over 10 years and they are not good pets for most people. They will stress out and possibly die from over-excessive handling, so it is a 'look but do not touch' animal, they require a heavily varied diet (not just crickets, but grasshoppers, mantids, black soldier fly larvae, silkworms and other hard-to-find, expensive prey) need regularly changed and monitored UVB (hope you've got a $300 UVB meter to check it regularly!) a constantly monitored temperature differential, and require misting for 2-4 times a day or they will easily dehydrate and die, so they are not for people with 9-5 jobs or those unwilling to invest ($150-1500) in a misting system. Live plants and screen cages are a requirement, not a suggestion, and some species can actually stress themselves into a coma and eventually die from being looked at directly or handled. Not an animal I'd recommend for the faint of heart or anyone, really.

    I love them, but I'm crazy, and most people find them very expensive and easy to kill, so I would avoid them and stick to cresties unless you've got a lot of time to research, research, RESEARCH before you buy. Money is also a factor: one cham can easily cost you $100/month to feed and mine are usually more like $150, and that's not including the purchase price for the cage, the cham itself, the plants, and a higher water bill. OH and replacing UVB bulbs. $$$$ for sure.
    3.8.0 C. ciliatus , 1.1 G. vittatus , 0.1 G. gekko , 2.0 F. pardalis ambilobe, 1.0 C. calyptratus, 0.1 P. grandis, 1.0 P. curtus

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    • #3
      Unless you're looking at pygmy chams that tank would be too small to keep a baby cham in for any period of time. As for keeping them in glass in general there are many articles on keeping chams in large exoterra terrariums for northern climates if you live in a warmer climate glass is all around a bad idea. For foods most bug supply websites carry a large enough selection to keep your cham happy. Timers for lights and a high quality auto misting system are a must.

      Sent from my SGH-I727R using Tapatalk 2

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      • #4
        The chams that do well in glass terrariums (pygmies/false chams) do well in very low-profile, well-ventilated, somewhat arid conditions, and are not easiy available in the hobby to a casual buyer, just to avoid confusion here. Most chams you're gonna see on the market are Old World chams, and absolutely require fully ventilated mesh enclosures. Europeans do well with carefully set up and monitored Exos with fans for their Carpets and pygs, but I would not recommend glass for anything such as a veiled or a pardalis species that would be easily available at your local pet shop or expo. Some old school keepers insist on raising their veiled babies in glass or Rubbermaid before moving them to screen, in a misguided belief that they require more humidity at that age (they don't; they hatch in Yemen's scrublands and do not care about it) but newer research has proved that to be a bad move.

        As far as websites, a)good luck finding anything that sells more than the typical crix/roaches/worms and b)you'd better be good at stalking those sites for when they restock, because they are often out of the rarer prey items, and the big breeders buy them out quick when they do have stock available, because culturing most of them is damn near impossible. I'm reliant on my mantis oothecas, dubia colony, stick insect colony, several different worm colonies (supers, pheonix, butters, horn-NEVER mealworms) and the occasional desperate cricket purchase. When I can find a site with something to sell me I'm stupid excited, let me tell you.
        3.8.0 C. ciliatus , 1.1 G. vittatus , 0.1 G. gekko , 2.0 F. pardalis ambilobe, 1.0 C. calyptratus, 0.1 P. grandis, 1.0 P. curtus

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        • #5
          I thank you both very much I have done some research. I was just wondering bout a glass tank to start with since the the baby is no bigger than my pinky finger. But I was just wanting a little bit more insite on what someone thought.i I really do appreciate your guys answers. My room doesnt have alot of people traffic. I always see them at reptile shows n just haven't got one yet. I like to do all the research I possibly can before getting any type of animal n also getting all the necessary things I possibly need. Yet again thank you so very much.
          Crested geckos 4:5:15
          Chewie. 0:1:1

          http://www.facebook.com/cjgeckos

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          • #6
            You should definitely not start out your chameleon owning experience with a baby no longer than your pinkie. It sounds like you're seeing the batches of veiled babies that shady breeders have for sale at the expos, and they're not a good idea to buy. A reputable breeder will not sell you a baby younger than 5-6 months because babies often die, even with the best of situations. Chams have huge groups of babies, and nearly half of them will often die before reaching the six month stage.

            Regardless of how high or low traffic your area is, you will need a screen enclosure, unless you are purchasing a false or pygmy cham. Good luck, definitely keep up with the research.
            3.8.0 C. ciliatus , 1.1 G. vittatus , 0.1 G. gekko , 2.0 F. pardalis ambilobe, 1.0 C. calyptratus, 0.1 P. grandis, 1.0 P. curtus

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            • #7
              Yes I will keep up with the research.n yes I do see a bunch of babies at the shows n im afraid to buy one that small solely because of it dieing from just being to small. N I wouldnt mind starting off with a pygmy charm I like those solely for there size. I just see a bunch of miss information here n there on different sites n it kinda makes you wonder on what the truth is.
              Crested geckos 4:5:15
              Chewie. 0:1:1

              http://www.facebook.com/cjgeckos

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              • #8
                chameleonforums.com is the most informed site on the web that I've seen for chameleon info. The posters there will help you with selection and setup, and their caresheets are the best. I wouldn't start with a pygmy chameleon; they're hard to find and easy to kill. The best 'beginner' cham is a Veiled, although no cham is easy to care for.

                Googling brings up all kinds of crappy caresheets for chameleons that advise handling, glass cages and waaay too much heat in most cases. Be selective and choose your sources wisely.
                3.8.0 C. ciliatus , 1.1 G. vittatus , 0.1 G. gekko , 2.0 F. pardalis ambilobe, 1.0 C. calyptratus, 0.1 P. grandis, 1.0 P. curtus

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