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  • OK I have a question.....

    OK I have a question, I have 2 house geckos and I read that the particular kind I have are only female and in the pet trade pretty much come with the ability to reproduce on their own. So here is the question is this true and should I put them by their selves because right now they are bunking with my crested boys. I have not seen any aggression toward them or any problems other then an escapee once.
    iHerp page the name is daisys_3299

  • #2
    Yes please separate them at once. It is never a good idea to house different species in the same enclosure. It sounds like you are talking about the parthenogenic mourning gecko? I can't give you any further advice as I'm not familiar with that particular species, but I'm sure others will chime in. Just separate the two species as soon as possible.
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    • #3
      Originally posted by daisys_3299 View Post
      So here is the question is this true and should I put them by their selves because right now they are bunking with my crested boys.
      I just reread your post and found something I had previously overlooked. Do you have multiple male crested geckos housed together? From what you wrote it sounds as if there are multiple male crested geckos and multiple mourning geckos all in the same enclosure. If there are males housed together I suggest separating them as well. You may not have witnessed them displaying aggression towards one another, but that does not mean they don't exhibit it.
      http://emilyburke.carbonmade.com
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      • #4
        I have another question, sorry, Why do we separate all species when in the wild although maybe not these species, are not alone. I mean they will run into others of their kind if not each other then the other sub species. It doesn't make since to separate to me to keep them apart when in real life they would not be.
        iHerp page the name is daisys_3299

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        • #5
          You would also have to understand how large the inclosure is too. Due to being so large the tend to stay away and have their own sleeping spaces. And in due time I am going to separate them into their own places just want time to let them get a little bigger.
          iHerp page the name is daisys_3299

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          • #6
            In the wild there is an immense amount of space that allows animals to coexist. When they are forced into enclosures they are almost always within two or three feet of each other, and cage aggression is extremely prevalent between crested gecko males. These animals are no longer in the wild, and so you can not play by what works in nature and expect them to get along.
            On another note, is this a grow out cage? Young crested geckos should be kept in enclosures suitable for their size. If they are in too big of an enclosure, many problems regarding them not finding their food and slow growth rates arise.
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            • #7
              It is but my guys are at 30grams each and as I said they have their areas, also you can breed in captivity but you can not breed out the wild. These guys know how to hunt regardless. So there again these animals are just understanding you mean food and you come in their space. It doesn't mean that they look at you like a dog would. They hang out until they see a better place to be. I mean can anyone really tell me that these guys really love you like a dog would? And isn't the job we take on when having one of these guys it to simulate what they would have in the wild so that they are healthy and well for lack of a better word "happy"?
              iHerp page the name is daisys_3299

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              • #8
                I completely agree with you in that we need to make these guys as happy as we can, however I just don't think the situation that you are putting them all in is a good choice. It will cause un-needed stress and all animals would be better off in their own respective enclosures (I believe mourning geckos are communal and will do fine if housed with other mourning geckos, but please separate the male cresties into their own cages). You can simulate a natural environment by housing them in a planted vivarium, but housing multiple species together causes to many problems than it is worth.
                I don't quite know what you mean by "you can not breed out the wild" though..
                Please don't take all of this as me attacking you, I'm really just trying to make you aware of the problems that can arise if you continue housing them all in their current situation.
                http://emilyburke.carbonmade.com
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                • #9
                  Originally posted by daisys_3299 View Post
                  You would also have to understand how large the inclosure is too. Due to being so large the tend to stay away and have their own sleeping spaces. And in due time I am going to separate them into their own places just want time to let them get a little bigger.
                  How large is your enclosure? Help us understand.
                  JBsCresties.com & Facebook & Instagram, oh my

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                  • #10
                    Here's an issue: Even if your cresteds get along fine, mourning geckos are indeed parthenogenic, very hardy and easy to reproduce, and the offspring are perfect prey size for those crested boys.

                    Noelle

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                    • #11
                      I really think you need to research these animals more and get them separated asap. If I recall house geckos are much smaller than crested geckos, and if you have them with large males they more than likely are being bullied or could become food. It would be like housing gorillas with chimps. Or lions with bobcats. They might seem to be tolerant of each other but that's about it and you probably have no idea what goes on while you are sleeping either. They probably are very stressed. Species shouldn't be placed together, only if you are a license professional and know what your doing, know how animals act. Also lizards don't 'love' or show affection like a dog or cat would, they are independent and they like to be alone most of their lives besides for mating.
                      0.0.3 Crested Geckos -Babies: Blaze and Bandit- Juvenile: Thicket
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                      • #12
                        There seems to be many issues with this post.


                        Addressing your "in the wild" argument, as a responsible reptile keeper and hobbyist one should not try to emulate wild conditions as it is, but improve upon them. The goal is to help the animal thrive, not just survive. It looks like yours are surviving instead of thriving; if they are indeed house geckos you're talking of in the Hemidactylus genus, they require a basking spot that exceeds the optimum temperature for crested geckos. Furthermore, house geckos would not even encounter a crested gecko in the wild. They are native to southeast Asia and have not been imported to wild parts of New Caledonia. Mourning geckos, which are parthenogenic and may be what you're referring to, are also native to southeast Asia.

                        The housing requirements of all of these species are very different, and as such these species should not be kept together. If given the opportunity a crested gecko will eat a smaller lizard - 30 grams is not always fully grown, and if the other species in question is housed with an adult crested, it is a matter of time until it becomes dinner.

                        Again, as others have stated, reptilian bullying does not occur in the same fashion as mammalian bullying. Some owners have a tendency to anthropomorphize their reptiles and thus think that "cuddling" or sleeping together is an indication of getting along. Rather, it is very different and they are competing for the best spot in the enclosure. Housing multiple males is a recipe for disaster and only a matter of time until one loses a tail, toe, crests, or dies. In the wild they have huge places to hide. I seriously doubt that regardless of how big the enclosure is to keep in a house it can match the entirety of the Isle of Pines.

                        Please, for the safety of your animals, separate them all. At the very best you are putting them at a risk this way.
                        My collection

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                        • #13
                          Did you create this post for advice and answers? Why dispute everything said if that is the case... Spring is here and I would be very concerned about the two male Cresteds being together at the size and age they now are. Nature, or the "wild" in them will prevail at some point. Good luck to your geckos.

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                          • #14
                            I know it's not always easy to make a post and get answers you don't want to hear, but please realize people here are sharing their opinions and experiences. So far, I agree with 99% of what's been posted. Those animals should not be housed together. If you have house geckos or mourning geckos, they would not meet crested geckos in the wild, so your argument is invalid.

                            A couple of years ago, we housed two juvenile 20-25ish gram males together for a short time. Once I moved them into separate enclosures with females, they were never put back together. If you do not have any females, they may be ok living together. I do not recommend it to the average person. Most males will come to blows at some point, especially if you have females in the same room. If you don't have females, and don't intend on getting any, they will probably be fine if the enclosure is big enough. But it's definitely not ok to house multiple species in the same enclosure, regardless of size.
                            Krystal

                            Gekkonidazed Geckos

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                            • #15
                              Lions and gazelle live together in the wild, but you won't find them housed together in zoos! Death is common in any wild species. Competition for mates, food, space, etc. In the wild one male kills another and nobody misses him. Unless you want your males to do the same in captivity, I suggest you separate them.
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