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  • Breeding Anoles

    I was thinking of Breeding Anoles...does anyone have any Experience?
    Are they easy or hard to breed?
    I was looking For any advice you guys have on Breeding Conditions?
    I want to give them a suitable Environment (Temp,Substrait,etc.)
    Any advice would be greatly appreciated by The Anoles and I.



    Thanks In Advance
    Our zoo
    1.0.2 cresties (Zae, Minninnewah [it means whirlwind] and the other in un named)
    0.1.0 ball python (medusa)
    2.0.0 Leopard geckos (Leo and Pard)
    1.0.0 corn snake (Victor)

  • #2
    What type of anoles do you have (or are you getting)?
    .. Familiar Exotics .. and related Blog ..


    *** 7.16.10 Cresties *** 4.5 Gargs *** 1.0 Ibera Greek Tortoise *** 0.1 Rubber Boa *** 0.2.1.2 Mourning Geckos *** 2.1.3 E. agricolae *** 1.2.2.7 L. williamsi *** 1.1 C. sarasinorum ***

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    • #3
      They are Green Anoles.
      Our zoo
      1.0.2 cresties (Zae, Minninnewah [it means whirlwind] and the other in un named)
      0.1.0 ball python (medusa)
      2.0.0 Leopard geckos (Leo and Pard)
      1.0.0 corn snake (Victor)

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      • #4
        lol pretty much house them they way they should and they will breed. I would suggest for a pair at least a 10 gallon tank, 15 gallon tall would be even better. If you want a trio I would however suggest a 20 gallon. This will simply give the girls enough room to get away from him. Like I said house them as you normally would with the right temps and humidity and they will naturally breed.

        I will however forwarn you the babies can be difficult to care for, have an extreamly high fatality rate and will require fruit flies or spring tails. The eggs need to be incubated between 80-85 degrees so you will need access to an incubator. And it will be required to house each baby by itself as babies often fight. They will not drink standing water and often will not drink even water droplets. Like I said, easy to breed but extreamly hard to raise.
        lets just say I have a lot of stuff
        www.sublimereptiles.com
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        • #5
          I have a 20 gallon tall. There is one anole that I'm picking up tomorrow morning, I am unsure of the gender so I'll check that once i recieve him/her, and I'll buy a mate accordingly.

          Also I have a question, if they don't drink standing water or water droplets what will they drink? (and will electrolytes help that situation?)

          Thank you
          Our zoo
          1.0.2 cresties (Zae, Minninnewah [it means whirlwind] and the other in un named)
          0.1.0 ball python (medusa)
          2.0.0 Leopard geckos (Leo and Pard)
          1.0.0 corn snake (Victor)

          Comment


          • #6
            Well do remember you will want to QT each gecko, and these guys are VERY cage aggressive and will often beat up on newly added anoles. Anoles are also wild caught, and often have trouble adjusting to captive life, so by keeping them QT for 90 days from one another will help monitor them to insure they are healthy, even if you get them from the same place.

            Anoles normally drip water droplets. I would suggest getting a water dripped from the pet store for chameleons and use that for water. Get a large dish to collect the water in otherwise your substrate will get way to wet and mold. In the water dish I put in a plant to make sure that if an anole gets in it, it can easily get back out again with any issues. I also had the dripper dripping onto a plant itself as they will drink from the leaves themselves.

            You will also need to mist them down several times a day, and have them with a basking area of around 85 degrees.

            Since you are getting your first anole, I honestly would put breeding on the back burner for right now, you have alot to learn in just the care area itself, not trying to be mean or anything, but if you dont even have the basics down, youre not even close enough to be ready for breeding yet.

            I would suggest you do more reading up on them before trying to jump into breeding, like I said the babies are terribly hard to care for. Here is a link of some good info on the care of anoles
            http://www.anapsid.org/anole.html
            lets just say I have a lot of stuff
            www.sublimereptiles.com
            Facebook
            BOI

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            • #7
              Why Thank You.
              By the Way its a Girl.lol
              Our zoo
              1.0.2 cresties (Zae, Minninnewah [it means whirlwind] and the other in un named)
              0.1.0 ball python (medusa)
              2.0.0 Leopard geckos (Leo and Pard)
              1.0.0 corn snake (Victor)

              Comment


              • #8
                Anoles seem to do MUCH better with a lot of cover. Which sucks, because you'll mostly only see them when they're basking, but they aren't usually very keen to letting you see them in general. If you do somehow manage to get them tame enough, they're very fun to watch eat, but I usually have to watch my girl eat from afar.
                And watch out for surprises when you open your cage door. Some people don't realize they climb glass and screen quite well. And they jump pretty high. I often found mine jumping up to the top of her 10 gallon tank to hang upside-down on the screen.
                ALL GLORY TO THE HYPNOGECKO

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by thongwedgie View Post
                  I will however forwarn you the babies can be difficult to care for, have an extreamly high fatality rate and will require fruit flies or spring tails. The eggs need to be incubated between 80-85 degrees so you will need access to an incubator. And it will be required to house each baby by itself as babies often fight. They will not drink standing water and often will not drink even water droplets. Like I said, easy to breed but extreamly hard to raise.
                  Yes-they are a pain, but here are a few things I did.

                  I used a heating pad-the kind Grandpa used to use for his bad back-set on low-rather than an incubator. I had the eggs in a drum style fish bowl with vermiculite, sitting on the heating pad. I used a coffee can lid for a topper for the bowl.

                  I fed the hatchlings pinhead crickets dusted in Reptavite and mashed fruit.

                  Mine actually did drink standing water from a baby food jar lid, but I also misted 3 to 4 times a day.

                  I also kept my babies in a 10 gallon very heavily planted tank.
                  Last edited by samanthajane13; 05-06-2010, 01:56 AM. Reason: forgot something
                  Love and Light-
                  Donna

                  "What is man without the beasts? If all the beasts were gone, man would die from a great loneliness of spirit, for whatever happens to the beasts soon happens to the man. All things are connected."-Chief Seattle

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                  • #10
                    I do want to mention which i didnt see in the other posts, but anoles dont need a laying box either... I kept mine in a 10 Hex with sand in it and they would lay thier eggs under the water dishes, plant bases, or anywhere they can dig a slight tunnel under to lay... the eggs look like tic tacs but a tad bigger bout the size of the new larger ones made now... as for hatching i wouldnt know as i would always find them when i would be cleaning out the cage at work and same goes for the Bahama Anole... Love the little escape artists lol....
                    Restarting After a HUGE Devistation this Fall...

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                    • #11
                      Wow I couldnt get my anole babies to take pinhead crickets, they seemed far to large for them to eat. I honestly had better success with the longtain grass lizard babies I hatched out. But I personally did all of this at work, our setups were weird and we had this gap about 7" tall inbetween each row of tanks, which was covered and it had sliding plastic doors. I just kept the eggs in there since it got 87 degrees in that little area in the side we had the more heat living side. But for the sake of it as many do not drink standing water, I would still highly suggest a dripper, and for the babies mist often.

                      Jate, I thin these guys actually do better with even mre cover then the crested geckos. I normally suggest for these guys about 75% cover, which includes bamboo shoots and vines. If set up right they will come out. They remind me of the day geckos, after awhile they will calm down when you come in the room quitely, but if you stop around or make alot of noise they will hide more.

                      I love the Bahaman/Cuban anoles, althogh more aggressive then their green cousins, I love the males little crest!
                      lets just say I have a lot of stuff
                      www.sublimereptiles.com
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