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  • New problems feeding leopard geckos

    I have had two female leopard geckos living together in a 20 gal tank for a few years now. There has been no problems with fighting or anything like that - they’ve always gotten along well, but recently I’ve been noticing some territorial issues with food.

    I have one leopard gecko that won’t eat for me and is not interested in eating when offered. She came to me as a rescue and she was raised being hand fed, so that is how I have ensured she’s been eating past couple of years. She is not super thin, but some weight loss is starting to become noticeable. My second leopard gecko will not stop eating, and has had some noticeable weight gain. Because off this I have a hard time leaving a bowl of food in the tank as I know my first leopard gecko isn’t eating and I’m over feeding my second leopard gecko.

    I’ve tried to separate and feed with no luck, and have placed her in a separate container to eat and she’s not interested. I’ve tried both mealworms and crickets - with the current quarantine it’s hard to really explore other options. She still seems content, lays out in the open and sleeps all spread out during the day, seems alert and not lethargic. It’s been a few weeks now since I’ve last seen her eat with my own eyes - any advice? Haven’t had problems with food up until recently I’m trying to figure out what changed..thinking maybe their size difference might be causing some power problems? Thanks you!

  • #2
    Some ovulating females don't want to eat around now. It could be bullying (dynamics can change even after a few years), or it could be that one isn't that hungry. If there's any way to separate them consistently for awhile so the one that gets moved has time to get used to her enclosure, that may help. Otherwise, you may have to keep offering and just wait her out.

    Aliza

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    • #3
      I got a female Leo gecko a few months ago. Since then she's shed twice but hasn't eaten anything except her skin. I've tried feeding her mealworms but she isn't taking them. Her tail is starting to shrink too. Any ideas?

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      • #4
        Where did you get this leopard gecko from? Do you know what she was being fed before you got her? Are you finding any poops? I may have some more thoughts after I get the answer to these questions.

        Aliza

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        • #5
          I got her from a friend who wasn't able to keep her anymore. From what I've heard she's been eating mealworms before I got her. I have been finding poops in her enclosure

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          • #6

            I’ve tried to separate and feed with no luck, and have placed her in a separate container to eat and she’s not interested. I’ve tried both mealworms and crickets - with the current quarantine it’s hard to really explore other options. She still seems content, lays out in the open and sleeps all spread out during the day, seems alert and not lethargic. It’s been a few weeks now since I’ve last seen her eat with my own eyes - any advice? Haven’t had problems with food up until recently I’m trying to figure out what changed..thinking maybe their size difference might be causing some power problems? Thanks you!

            Comment


            • #7
              So there are now 3 different people writing about their leopard geckos that aren't eating and it's getting a little tough to keep it all straight. Here are some general thoughts:
              --a gecko that's not eating but continues to be active and is not losing weight (tail getting thinner) is probably OK. Keep offering and be patient
              --a gecko that's housed with another gecko that exhibits behavior changes may be (but not necessarily) having problems with the cagemate. If not losing weight, don't worry. If looking scratched up and losing weight, try a trial separation (not just for feeding)
              -- a gecko that has behavior changes, is losing weight and is housed alone needs to see a reptile vet.

              Aliza

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