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Thread: New Gecko Owner...Worries

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
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    Default New Gecko Owner...Worries

    Hi,
    I'm new to owning a crested gecko, done tons of research and have gotten everything and anything this little guy (or girl) needs. I brought him or her only yesterday and he hasn't eaten. I figured he/she had already eaten and would either eat later at night or the next day. The next day and he/she still hasn't eaten. i let him/her taste a big of the food on my finger (He's very social and doesn't mind being held) but he just licked it a little and wasn't interested much. The food we have is CGD Repashy. How long should I wait before I start to get worried he/she hasn't eaten? My gecko is only about 3-4 inches in size and red. When we turn on the heating lamp (Lowish watt so he doesn't get over heated the temp stays at 75-80 since it is winter and I wanted to make sure he was warm enough. The humidity stays at 60-80%.) he turns bright red. I'm not sure if this means the light is too much and he is becoming stressed out or if that is just him relaxing and the bright red color is nothing to worry about. Also, when the light is on I've noticed he doesn't move much and I figure that is just because they dwell at night and he thinks it time to hide or if it is something to worry about. He is very active at night and doesn't mind being held but once he goes in his/her terrarium (5.5 gal upright. Didn't want to get anything bigger and overwhelm them. Will move them into a bigger tank when I think necessary.) he just doesn't move when the light is on. I'm a bit worried and would like some advice on if I should be concerned as I am or not. Thank you, sorry this is so long. Lol!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    Cupertino, Ca
    Posts
    147

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    It often takes up to four weeks for geckos to start eating in a new environment. If it's been three weeks and you still see no evidence of eating (like lick marks or poop) then post again. IN the meantime, don't worry. I'd be shocked if your gecko was eating already. It's normal for them not to move when the lights are on. You don't have to worry about the color change. Make sure that heating light source doesn't get any hotter than 80 degrees because they overheat quite quickly (It sounds like you've got this covered). Make sure the lights are only on in the day, if you need to heat him up at night use a ceramic heat emitter. Blue and red lights have been show to disrupt their day/night cycles if left on at night. Sounds like you're doing a great job taking care of your little guy. Mine took almost 3 weeks to eat, same size as yours. Don't worry. You're doing great

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Posts
    34

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    An important thing to remember is to let your gecko (wether you believe it doesn't mind being held) to allow it to become accustom to it's new home by not handling it and let do it's thing for 1 1/2 - 2 weeks. 3-4 inches, I"m assuming that it is a hatchling, so it may take a few weeks for it to eat. Even then, even if you don't think it is eating, chances are it's taking very tiny licks from it's food bowl but you won't be able to tell because they have are still very young and tiny. Just continue to check for waste through the week, mist it to make sure it is hydrated. As for the brightening up of color is just crestie firing up which is normal in all cresties. Sounds like you're doing good with with temps/space.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
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    439

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    You should avoid handling for the first 2 weeks to let your gecko settle. It can take a gecko up to a month to start eating. They can go a long time without eating so I wouldn't worry until it is a month and they have yet to eat. If it is two weeks and they still haven't eaten, don't start handling until they do. Handling is stressful and if they are already stressed from being in a new environment, handling just adds to it. Don't hand feed, it can cause them to become addicted to it and they may refuse to eat any other way.

    Humidity should fall to 50-60% during the day and be like 80-100% during the night. They need a drying out period during the day in order to avoid lung problems and it prevents mold and bacteria from forming in the tank. When do you turn on the heat lamp? If the lamp produces light, it should not be on at night since this will disrupt their sleeping cycle. He likely stops moving when the light is on because he thinks it is daytime and therefore he is going to sleep. Cresties can see red light so even a red infared lamp is not good for night time heat. You need a ceramic bulb for night heat. Turning a brighter color means the gecko is firing up. Mine tend to fire up in the evenings when they wake up, and will especially do this after I spray the tank with water. They can fire up for many reasons so it probably isn't a concern as long as the light is being used at the proper times of the day.

    How much does you gecko weigh? Weight is how people determine when a gecko should live in a bigger enclosure. Since gecko growth rate is all over the place, age is not a good determination of what the size would be.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
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    2

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    Thank you so much for replying. I turn the light on during the day to help keep it warm for him/her due to it being winter and our house not being the warmest but during the night we have our central heating turned on and it is the warmest so I turn it off. It doesn't drop below 60 degrees. With the dry period, is this okay over night? Like, is it okay for the humidity to fall when the light is off and temps are a bit lower? And with the firing up, I know or I've read that the geckos will darken when stressed and when handling he/she does get a bit darker but nothing crazy. But with the light he/she gets lighter? To be sure; this isn't something I should be extremely concerned about? I just looked and he/she is defecating. I'm not sure of exact weight but he/she is very light. Not very large around at all. About the size of a finger nail width.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
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    No. It should be humid at night and dry during the day. They are active at night, when it should be cooler and they should have fresh water droplets available on the tank sides so that they can drink. It should be drier during the day when it is light out and they are in darker cooler places sleeping. I don't even really know how it could be less humid with the lights off. Having heat lamps on is usually one of the main ways a tank dries out. When my heat lamps are off at night, it barely dries out at all by the time I get up in the morning and turn them back on, but when they are on during the day I usually have to spray in the later afternoon and evening to keep it humid enough until lamp off time.

    I dont quite get what you are saying about the heating at night. Are you saying the temperature is warmer at night then during the day? It's probably not a good idea to do that, it would probably screw them up since in nature it's colder at night when it is dark then during the day with the warm sun.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    East-central Wisconsin
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    Think like a jungle - cool and damp at night, warm and dry during the day.

    Also, 60 is too low for the temperature to drop. Minimum should be 65; upper 60's to low 70's is best at night, and humid; mid to upper 70's (but not 80) daytime, with light.
    Eileen
    TAD (Tiny Ancient Dinosaur) - Yellow flame dash pinstripe crestie 1.0.0
    Hygge - Brown reticulated gargoyle 0.0.1
    TBD (Tiny Badass Dragon) - E. agricolae 1.0.0
    Rody Jane - Cattledog/stinkwad mix 0.1.0, Dixie Moonpie - Rattledog 0.1.0, Ancient barn cats - 3.0.0

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