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Thread: Getting a leopard gecko but tank is too big??

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    Default Getting a leopard gecko but tank is too big??

    So i had a mississippi map turtle in a 60-70 gallon tank but i sold it after 3 years, i was wondering if i can put a leopard gecko in there if not please suggest me easy beginner lizards i can buy in a 60-70 gallon tank. BTW im new to this forum and i love it.

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    OK, you sold the turtle, not the tank.

    I don't have a leo, but they are good reptiles for a horizontal tank. I don't know what the optimal size is for a leo, so hopefully someone else will chime in - but if you are planning to use the whole tank, I'd at least get an adult - it would be way too big for a baby. Or, you could put a divider in it and just use that for the one - and then when you get a second one (because they are addicting, lol), you could put it in the other side of the tank. Cut a piece of acrylic to fit, and use aquarium-safe silicone to hold it in place.
    Eileen
    TAD "Tiny Ancient Dinosaur" (Crestie), Hygge (Garg), O.G. "Office Gecko" (Bauer's Chameleon), TBD "Tiny Badass Dragon" (Cuban False Chameleon), 2.2.0
    Rody Jane (cattledog/stinkwad mix), Dixie Moonpie (rattledog) 0.2.0, Barn cats 0.2.0

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    An older juvenile or adult leopard gecko should be fine in there. Otherwise, consider getting a bearded dragon if you have the resources (i.e. lighting, basking, crickets, greens).

    Aliza

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    Quote Originally Posted by acpart View Post
    An older juvenile or adult leopard gecko should be fine in there. Otherwise, consider getting a bearded dragon if you have the resources (i.e. lighting, basking, crickets, greens).

    Aliza
    Well right now im considering either a giant day gecko or a leopard gecko and im going more towards the leopard gecko because idk what to do with the day gecko if i take a vacation or something about the misting while the leopard gecko would be easier... Anyway, Are you sure an adult leopard would be fine in there? I mean I don't want to buy something to stress it out and I have a 15 gallon verticale aquarium I could place it as a baby.

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    If you get a baby, start with the 15 gallon and move it into the larger enclosure when it gets bigger. In the wild leopard geckos have a pretty large range, I believe, so it should be able to handle an enclosure that size

    Just a note on the day gecko: I do leave my day geckos as well as other rainforest geckos like cresties without misting for a few days if I go away and everyone is fine. However, I don't think the enclosure is going to be tall enough (unless you rotate it 90 degrees) for an adult giant day gecko.

    Aliza

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    The tank is quite big and its vertically tall too but it doesnít matter because Iím set on getting a leopard gecko. So a 50-60 gallon tank should be fine for a juvenile-adult?

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    I don't see a problem with it. If you're going to be feeding mealworms, put the bowl near the warm side hides so they're easy to find. If you feel the gecko is having trouble catching crickets/dubias (if that's what you choose to feed), after you've given it time to settle in, you can always remove furniture at feeding time and/or use a piece of cardboard or plexiglass to block off part of the tank and create a small area for hunting.

    Aliza

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    Feeding time wonít be a big problem since i own a crested gecko and crickets shouldnt be hard to feed, thanks for all the advice guys this is a cool community

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    Just make sure your heat mat covers 1/3 to 1/2 of the tank. Good luck!

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