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Thread: Leopard Gecko Vivarium Won't Heat Up

  1. #1
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    Default Leopard Gecko Vivarium Won't Heat Up

    Hey everyone. My first post here. Anyway, my oldest son has been scrimping and saving to get a leopard gecko, probably for about seven months now. He finally got the funds together and got mom's OK, even with her being creeped out by all things scaly. So, about three weeks ago, we got a 20 gallon tank and what we thought was all we needed to get it going, including an UTH pad. Well, that raised the temp in the room we keep it in by a balmy 3 degrees, from 70 to 73. Fast forward to late last week and I exchanged the UTH for a 75w lamp and 60w Zoo Med Moonlite bulb. Temp went from 70 to 75.

    So, the question is, what can I do to raise the heat to an appropriate level? My son is pretty bummed that he did all this hard work and got the supplies, but now we can't figure out how to get it ready to go.

  2. #2
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    Ceramic heat emitter (in a wire holder with ceramic base) might be the next thing to try. Don't put it in a dome lamp, it gets too hot that way, and can be a fire hazard. I have a crestie and a garg, so I'm not sure how much warmer a leo needs it to be. Maybe put some kind of graduated basking spot under the CHE, so he can move closer to it as he needs more heat?
    Eileen
    TAD (Tiny Ancient Dinosaur) - Yellow flame dash pinstripe crestie 1.0.0
    Hygge, aka TBD (Tiny Badass Dragon) - Brown reticulated gargoyle 0.0.1
    Rody Jane - Cattledog/stinkwad mix 0.1.0
    Dixie Moonpie - Rattledog 0.1.0
    Ancient barn cats - 3.0.0

  3. #3
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    Thanks, but I may have figured it out. I went to the local per store who is the lizard specialist in my area and explained the issue. They suggested moving the basking rock since it was hitting 110 on top (it's very tall) and bumping up to a 75 watt infrared bulb. What a difference! The light/heat from the bulb now gets to the ground unimpeded, and with the new bulb, the temp gradient is 110/80, which idls actually too high. With the old bulb, it's 80/70, which is too low. They should be between 85 and 93 degrees on the hot sidd. 87-90 is ideal But, I think I'm getting it dialed in.

    As a jump of 35 degrees in temp seems high just for a 15 watt increase, I wonder if the type of bulb is making a difference. I'm going to take the 75 watt back and either go with a lower watt infrared, or a higher watt blue Moonlite.

    And, what does CHE mean? Couldn't find it in the list of acronyms.

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  5. #4
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    CHE = ceramic heat emitter. It sounds like that's what you got.
    Eileen
    TAD (Tiny Ancient Dinosaur) - Yellow flame dash pinstripe crestie 1.0.0
    Hygge, aka TBD (Tiny Badass Dragon) - Brown reticulated gargoyle 0.0.1
    Rody Jane - Cattledog/stinkwad mix 0.1.0
    Dixie Moonpie - Rattledog 0.1.0
    Ancient barn cats - 3.0.0

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    Surprisingly, no. It was an infrared bulb. Just strong as heck, apparently.

  7. #6
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    Are you measuring temperatures in the air or on the ground, and how are you measuring the temperatures. Ideally hot side temperatures should be in the low 90's on the ground (not in the air) as measured by a temperature gun or a digital thermometer with a probe. In my opinion, air temperatures that are relentlessly above the mid 70's and generated by a heat lamp are too hot and could dehydrate the gecko.

    Aliza

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    Using a pair of analog thermometers, placed on the ground.

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