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Thread: is plum bark poisonious??

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    Question is plum bark poisonious??

    Hey everyone, i just cut a bunch of plum dowles for cadges, but google tells me their bark is toxic. So have any of you used plum or know that its not safe for geckos? i would hate for all that work to go to waist.
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    That is really weird. No plants in the rose family (which includes plum) have poisonous bark, to my knowledge. Yes, some of the bark has compounds in it that, if you boil it, and then drink the water, it may make you feel gross, but plum is harmless to the touch and harmless to cuddle up to (if that's what you think your geckos would do).

    I'd only worry about it if the tree had been sprayed with pesticides.
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    Hello, I really hate to jump in and correct someone on my first post, but almost all plants in the Prunus subfamily of the Rose family have poisonus bark and seeds. Any treefruit which produces drupes (hard stony seeds) like cherry, plums and peaches produces cyanide and cyanide precursors. A plum tree can actually poison itself if it stays flooded. The cyanide can't leach into the ground fast enough and the tree dies.

    The seeds, bark, and leaves contain a cyanide-producing compound called amygdalin. In addition, wild cherries (chokecherries) produce prunasin, a similar compound. Cyanide is associated with the smell of bitter almonds, but commercial almond oil is always treated to remove the cyanide. There are many instances of cattle, donkeys, horses and even pet rabbits dying after CONSUMING these barks and woods.

    I really don't think contact with the wood would cause any issues. The question to me is, "does mist water leach out the compounds into the droplets" and if so "is it in enough strength to cause issues". Personally, I would consider using something else, but I don't know for sure. Horticulture is my second hobby, so I thought I would share my knowledge. Hope it helps.

    Some people actually make tea out of prunus barks as home remedies and herbal treatments, but there are a few cases of accidental self poisoning and cumulative poisoning over time. Also, the human body can break down cyanides in small amounts, that is why a few apple seeds or an accidental cherry pit do not harm us. No one knows if geckos have the same ability to process micro amounts of these specific toxins.

    Quote Originally Posted by Treebiscuit View Post
    That is really weird. No plants in the rose family (which includes plum) have poisonous bark, to my knowledge. Yes, some of the bark has compounds in it that, if you boil it, and then drink the water, it may make you feel gross, but plum is harmless to the touch and harmless to cuddle up to (if that's what you think your geckos would do).

    I'd only worry about it if the tree had been sprayed with pesticides.

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    Whoa there. We're talking about whether plum branches would be a problem in crestie cages, not whether Rosaceae have any noxious compounds whatsoever! And where are you getting your info about plum trees poisoning themselves?

    Sheesh. (I can pull rank, too. Do you have a degree -- or two -- in botany? I do).
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    No offense meant. Just trying to offer some guidance. Most people are completely unawares that common plants have these compounds. I tend to over explain everything, it is just my way. :-)

    I didn't mean to step on anyone's toes. (Sorry again if it seemed that way). I got the information about plum trees poisoning themselves from my Botany professor. I just meant it as a little fun fact. We had a period of flooding in our state where it rained for 40+ days (not constantly, just some every day) and the ground never dried out. A few local orchards started losing peach and plum trees the professor shared the story with the class and explained how it worked. I have no degrees in botany, it is just a hobby.

    I guess what I meant to say was, it is possible that the branches could cause issues, but very hard to say. I do know that ingestion of these barks can kill horses and rabbits, but contact is another issue. I personally would just use a different material.

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    Relax, Dustin is just adding what he knows about the subject like i have requested. No need to get defenceive.

    Thank you for your info though! I thought they would be safe since it was a fruit bareing tree, but it seems there is conflicting evidence/opinions (including outside sourses).

    Quote Originally Posted by Treebiscuit View Post
    Whoa there. We're talking about whether plum branches would be a problem in crestie cages, not whether Rosaceae have any noxious compounds whatsoever! And where are you getting your info about plum trees poisoning themselves?

    Sheesh. (I can pull rank, too. Do you have a degree -- or two -- in botany? I do).
    2.2.4.4 Crested Gecko ( Panchi, Cobar, Jodhaa, Mocha, Poe, Durc, Tivonan, & Stelona.)
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    2.0 Dogs ( Mel, Buck )
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    Thank you Dustin!
    This confirms what i have read too, so i think i will scrap the plum dowles unless i make an art project with them. Or i may let them dry and see if i cant get the bark off or something.

    Two kinds of tree down, hundreds more to go! XD


    !
    Quote Originally Posted by Dustin McCall View Post
    Hello, I really hate to jump in and correct someone on my first post, but almost all plants in the Prunus subfamily of the Rose family have poisonus bark and seeds. Any treefruit which produces drupes (hard stony seeds) like cherry, plums and peaches produces cyanide and cyanide precursors. A plum tree can actually poison itself if it stays flooded. The cyanide can't leach into the ground fast enough and the tree dies.

    The seeds, bark, and leaves contain a cyanide-producing compound called amygdalin. In addition, wild cherries (chokecherries) produce prunasin, a similar compound. Cyanide is associated with the smell of bitter almonds, but commercial almond oil is always treated to remove the cyanide. There are many instances of cattle, donkeys, horses and even pet rabbits dying after CONSUMING these barks and woods.

    I really don't think contact with the wood would cause any issues. The question to me is, "does mist water leach out the compounds into the droplets" and if so "is it in enough strength to cause issues". Personally, I would consider using something else, but I don't know for sure. Horticulture is my second hobby, so I thought I would share my knowledge. Hope it helps.

    Some people actually make tea out of prunus barks as home remedies and herbal treatments, but there are a few cases of accidental self poisoning and cumulative poisoning over time. Also, the human body can break down cyanides in small amounts, that is why a few apple seeds or an accidental cherry pit do not harm us. No one knows if geckos have the same ability to process micro amounts of these specific toxins.
    2.2.4.4 Crested Gecko ( Panchi, Cobar, Jodhaa, Mocha, Poe, Durc, Tivonan, & Stelona.)
    0.1 Leopard Gecko ( Mehndi )
    1.0 Tokay Gecko ( Ralphie )
    2.0 Dogs ( Mel, Buck )
    0.4 Cats ( Koyo, Lupin, Hope, Flop-Tail )

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    Hi there, what if a meal worm or other insect eats the bark and then the gecko eats that ?

    Also Dustin do you know if the nertera granadensis berries are poisonous to cresties

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    Sorry, I have seen the plants but have no idea if geckos should eat them. I have read that some species of lizard eats them in the wild, but I do not know what kind. I would suggest erring on the side of caution. CGD is hard to beat!

    Quote Originally Posted by Percy- pigeon View Post
    Hi there, what if a meal worm or other insect eats the bark and then the gecko eats that ?

    Also Dustin do you know if the nertera granadensis berries are poisonous to cresties

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    Quote Originally Posted by Percy- pigeon View Post
    Hi there, what if a meal worm or other insect eats the bark and then the gecko eats that ?

    Also Dustin do you know if the nertera granadensis berries are poisonous to cresties
    Hello Percy, you have a very good point. I would imagine the feeder insect would then become toxic too.

    I don't feed insects though (and the rare times i do its outside the main enclosure) so that should not be a possibility, but i will certainly take that to heart.
    2.2.4.4 Crested Gecko ( Panchi, Cobar, Jodhaa, Mocha, Poe, Durc, Tivonan, & Stelona.)
    0.1 Leopard Gecko ( Mehndi )
    1.0 Tokay Gecko ( Ralphie )
    2.0 Dogs ( Mel, Buck )
    0.4 Cats ( Koyo, Lupin, Hope, Flop-Tail )

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