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Thread: New to Reptiles - Considering a Chameleon

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    Default New to Reptiles - Considering a Chameleon

    As the title states, I'm considering the reptile hobby.

    I currently own 4 aquariums, ranging from 4 to 210 gallons, all of which require daily care, and about 3-4 hours of work each weekend. I understand these aren't the best beginner lizards, but I plan to devote myself to the work that comes with owning a Chameleon, just like how I did with my aquariums.

    What should I know before owning one? I understand they're tree dwelling lizards, and they prefer a humid, screen habitat. That's about the extent of my knowledge.

    These were the materials I was planning to get. Is there anything else I need? Is this a good kit for a male Veiled Chameleon?

    Habitat kit: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...JX4FAVYN&psc=1

    Fogger: Amazon.com : https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...OJII3VEM&psc=1

    Chameleons: http://flchams.com/chameleon/premium...leon-for-sale/
    http://www.lllreptile.com/products/3...her-chameleons
    http://www.lllreptile.com/products/3...her-chameleons

    I'm leaning towards the baby panthers because they're much more colorful and only $30 more, but I'm having trouble deciding which to get. Both look good.

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    It's a loaded question.
    I''m sure with your aquarium experience, you would make it work. And while a Veiled is among the easiest of chameleons to keep...It's the complete opposite side of the spectrum from a beginners reptile. They require a lot of space, can get very nervous and eat a lot. Which means you're not only maintaining the reptile, but also it's food, which is a task in itself.
    You could learn a lot by starting off with a crested or a garg.
    We're gonna need a bigger boat.

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    Quote Originally Posted by chockablock View Post
    It's a loaded question.
    I''m sure with your aquarium experience, you would make it work. And while a Veiled is among the easiest of chameleons to keep...It's the complete opposite side of the spectrum from a beginners reptile. They require a lot of space, can get very nervous and eat a lot. Which means you're not only maintaining the reptile, but also it's food, which is a task in itself.
    You could learn a lot by starting off with a crested or a garg.
    The space isn't an issue. I found a 210 gallon aquarium for sale locally (and a discontinued one at that), so I'm sure I can get a large enough habitat. Based off what I read, the habitat I listed above should actually work. It's 24 x 24 x 48, and comes with the basic materials like a heat and uvb lamp, decor, and vitamin, chemical, and food samples.

    That's the problem. I don't think I'll be able to keep more than one reptile, which is why I want to start with a Chameleon.

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    Eileen
    TAD (Tiny Ancient Dinosaur) - Yellow flame dash pinstripe crestie 1.0.0
    Hygge, aka TBD (Tiny Badass Dragon) - Brown reticulated gargoyle 0.0.1
    Rody Jane - Cattledog/stinkwad mix 0.1.0
    Dixie Moonpie - Rattledog 0.1.0
    Ancient barn cats - 1.2.0

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    If you are really committed to a chameleon and all of the care it would take (for it and its food), then I think you could make it work. I've never had a chameleon and probably won't, because of the care they need, but I think they're pretty cool little animals. Various websites have care sheets for chameleons - if you google that, I'm sure there would be a wealth of good websites; just pay more attention to the ones from reputable reptile sites, rather than pet store sites.
    Eileen
    TAD (Tiny Ancient Dinosaur) - Yellow flame dash pinstripe crestie 1.0.0
    Hygge, aka TBD (Tiny Badass Dragon) - Brown reticulated gargoyle 0.0.1
    Rody Jane - Cattledog/stinkwad mix 0.1.0
    Dixie Moonpie - Rattledog 0.1.0
    Ancient barn cats - 1.2.0

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    You don't normally keep a Cham in an aquarium. They need to "feel the breeze" or they claustrophobic and start to decline. That's why they're generally kept in screened enclosures.
    Again, not against the project. I'm sure you can do it. Just want you to understand that they're very advanced. Not like some reptiles that as long as you throw some UVB on 'em and feed 'em correctly, they'll thrive. Chams are more delicate and infinitely more idiosyncratic. You may wanna hit up some chameleon forums before you purchase.

    Oh, and on the concept of "one reptile"....You start with one. The others follow very quickly once you realize how cool they are....

    On a separate note....Is it me, or has the internet made Chams "hip", like sloths and red pandas? Sounds like another Finding Nemo situation brewing...
    Last edited by chockablock; 08-11-2017 at 05:24 PM.
    We're gonna need a bigger boat.

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    Worries me a little - one of our local pet stores is carrying a lot of chameleons lately...they have very nice enclosures in the store and seem to be well cared for, but I wonder how many people who buy them know what they are getting into...
    Eileen
    TAD (Tiny Ancient Dinosaur) - Yellow flame dash pinstripe crestie 1.0.0
    Hygge, aka TBD (Tiny Badass Dragon) - Brown reticulated gargoyle 0.0.1
    Rody Jane - Cattledog/stinkwad mix 0.1.0
    Dixie Moonpie - Rattledog 0.1.0
    Ancient barn cats - 1.2.0

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    Petco carries Veilds. I see lots of suffering in their future.
    We're gonna need a bigger boat.

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    Quote Originally Posted by chockablock View Post
    You don't normally keep a Cham in an aquarium. They need to "feel the breeze" or they claustrophobic and start to decline. That's why they're generally kept in screened enclosures.
    Again, not against the project. I'm sure you can do it. Just want you to understand that they're very advanced. Not like some reptiles that as long as you throw some UVB on 'em and feed 'em correctly, they'll thrive. Chams are more delicate and infinitely more idiosyncratic. You may wanna hit up some chameleon forums before you purchase.

    Oh, and on the concept of "one reptile"....You start with one. The others follow very quickly once you realize how cool they are....

    On a separate note....Is it me, or has the internet made Chams "hip", like sloths and red pandas? Sounds like another Finding Nemo situation brewing...
    I've read about that. I believe it causes lung diseases/infections.

    I'm sure I'll probably get addicted to the hobby, but I don't think my parents would let me get more than one. They've already set a limit at 4 aquariums (If you get into the hobby, you'll understand that's not a lot. Each one has different fish and creates a different environment, with every one being unique)

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    I'd love to have a cham, but I've read up on their care on line, I got two big thick care books on them. As much as I want one, I cannot provide the proper temperature requirements. They are delicate. My favorite is the Ambanja panther. I've bred lots of insects over the years, so maintaining bug stocks isn't a big deal for me. If I was going to go through a lot, I bought in bulk till my own colonies got going, or just made a standing order to be shipped regularly (crickets are a stinky pain).

    And I've noticed the up tick in chams in box pet stores in the last few years, as well as small pet stores. I've also seen iguana babies being sold again too. Chams are hard because they need very specialized care. Iguanas are hard because they need UV and a proper diet, neither of which they usually get correctly; they get very big, and once mature they can be aggressive, especially males. They're awesome, but they need a lot of space, and have to be worked with constantly and provided enrichments to keep them active so they don't get fat or go stir-crazy. They are very intelligent and very active. Chameleons and iguanas are really not beginner reptiles.

    I'm not against you trying, but they are not easy. If you do get one, get it from a show or a breeder. Please don't support the box store animal factory chain.

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