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Thread: HELP! SEVERELY dyhydrated crestie

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    Default HELP! SEVERELY dyhydrated crestie

    Was gone for 7 days, my caretakers were supposed to feed 2x and mist/fill water every other day. Came home to find a young juvie in a dry cage severely dehydrated (near death). Is there anything I can do to save her!? I soaked her in a electrolyte/water bath, tried to get her to take some Karo syrup or food but she is so weak. Any suggestions?

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    Continue to soak her in water. Take the cotton off of the end of a q-tip, gently open her mouth with the q-tip and dab some pure honey into her mouth. I suggest taking her to the vet asap. Soak her in pedialyte and water. After several soaks- what is she housed in? If it's a small container, Kritter keeper or something, take everything out besides a couple small plants and put damp paper towels in the bottom. Spray the entire container with her in it. Use honey a couple different times. Use the q-tip and give her some food once she gains more strength. Keep me posted.
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    If you soaked your gecko in an electrolyte solution, make sure to rinse her with pure water, or keep soaking in pure water. I found that dried residue from electrolyte solution on the skin can lead to further dehydration. You can also try to syringe feed coconut water. It is diluted enough to not make the dehydration worse, but has some sugar to give your gecko energy.

    I would take the gecko to the vet as soon as possible - and let the (so-called) caretakers pay the bill. I would also report them for animal cruelty. It is cruel to you as well to let you believe your gecko is well cared for, only to find her near death when you come home.

    I hope she pulls through! Please keep us updated.
    1.1.0 Crested Geckos "Jackson Pollock" and "Pumpkin Spice" 1.0.0 Chahoua "Urmel" 1.1 Red eared sliders "Freddy Krueger" (25 years) and "Mucki" (45 years) RIP Peppermint (Green Anole)

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    Thank you for the comments (and suggestion about the electrolyte solution, lucia, I didn't know that!)

    She has perked up considerably today and I've gotten her to take a few licks of pangea. She's not out of the woods yet, but I'm very relieved at this point. I really thought I was going to lose her. Do you still think she needs veterinary care? The closest vet who will see reptiles is about an hour away (not a big deal, but I've been told he is "the best" in the area and I've had nothing but bad luck with him. This seems like a more "straight forward" treatment, so if you still think she needs to be seen I will take her.

    As far as the friends who took care of them, I'm not exactly sure what happened... everyone else looks great, I asked and she said last time she was here she had a full dish of water, but she didn't recall seeing that particular one... if she kicked it over right away, I still can't imagine she would have gotten to this point in less than 3 whole days?

    Again thank you for taking time to reply, keep the little beauty in your thoughts! I'm hopeful but not overly optimistic until she makes a full recovery. <3

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    I personally would take her to the vet just to make sure.

    What does she weigh? If she is small enough, she could dehydrate fast (also depends on temp). Idk about near death though. I agree with Lucia about having the caretakers pay for the bill. What do you mean by she didn't recall this one? The gecko itself, or the water dish? Also, geckos rarely drink from dishes, (although mine do) so it could be that she didn't drink any water from the dishes at all for the week.

    I'm so glad she's doing better!! Will you post a picture of her so we can see this beauty? Hope she gains full strength and hydration!
    Last edited by Lovelyanddekstest; 08-09-2017 at 10:27 AM.
    .1.DOG Jiggles
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    Quote Originally Posted by Justme99 View Post
    Thank you for the comments (and suggestion about the electrolyte solution, lucia, I didn't know that!)
    Yeah, I learned that one the hard way. Had a sick gecko that was getting dehydrated because he did not eat or drink enough. The daily pedialyte soaks apparently only made it worse, until I realized I was basically covering my gecko in a salt crust by letting the stuff dry on him.

    His dehydration got so bad that the vet decided to give him a subcutaneous fluid injection. It perked him up considerably, and this is the kind of emergency treatment you could only get from a vet. You may not need a reptile vet for the injection, but someone experienced with very small animals. Needless to say, my gecko hated it and was quite angry with me for a while, so I would only resort to injections if the gecko does not get better.

    If you want to keep up your home treatment, a good way to measure dehydration and monitor progress is by pulling up a skin fold, e. g. on the back between the crests. If the gecko is severely dehydrated, it takes a long time (like 20 seconds) for the skin to straighten out again. In a well hydrated gecko it pulls tight in a second or two. The vets use tests like this to quantify dehydration (there are probably tables for this or something).

    It is hard to say what happened, but maybe your caretaker forgot about this gecko? Is her tank smaller than the others, or in a different part of the room? In my experience, crested geckos do drink from dishes -- at least mine do. Geckos do not drink dirty water, so it should be changed every day, and the water dish should be hard to knock over and easy to reach by the gecko (e. g. no too high rim). I use two water bowls: one large shallow ceramic dish on the tank floor, and a large deli cup filled with water next to the gecko diet in Pangea feeding ledges.
    There is a fairly new care video by Altitude Exotics suggesting that cresties are fine with a water dish alone (apparently they never mist their gecko tanks). I am not sure I second this one, as I think rain is a natural part of the geckos' habitat, and it may also depend on the overall humidity of the gecko room if a gecko is OK without misting.

    I am so glad your gecko is doing better! Keep up the good work, and keep us updated!
    Last edited by Lucia; 08-09-2017 at 03:00 PM.
    1.1.0 Crested Geckos "Jackson Pollock" and "Pumpkin Spice" 1.0.0 Chahoua "Urmel" 1.1 Red eared sliders "Freddy Krueger" (25 years) and "Mucki" (45 years) RIP Peppermint (Green Anole)

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    Any updates? I hope your gecko is doing better!
    1.1.0 Crested Geckos "Jackson Pollock" and "Pumpkin Spice" 1.0.0 Chahoua "Urmel" 1.1 Red eared sliders "Freddy Krueger" (25 years) and "Mucki" (45 years) RIP Peppermint (Green Anole)

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