Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Maybe two male geckos in same vivarium. Questions...

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Posts
    12
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default Maybe two male geckos in same vivarium. Questions...

    We purchased an adolescent (maybe wrong term, kinda new to this...) crestie for our daughter in June 2015. We gave him/her the androgynous name of Taylor. By January, we were sure that Taylor was a female. S/he was at least 8 months old, the hemipenal bulge was fairly small and we couldn't see any pores. We wanted to get a companion (and mate) for Taylor so, thinking Taylor was a female, we purchased a large adult male (named Tyler) in early February.

    Three weeks later, Taylor's hemipenal bulge has grown and now I'm 70% sure Taylor is a male. I still have a hard time seeing pores, but I always have a hard time seeing the pores in the pictures of male cresties.

    I have seen a couple instances where Tyler is aggressive with Taylor, but at first I chalked it up to early stages of a mating ritual. But, the last few days I've seen some more aggression and I'm getting worried that Taylor is indeed a male. Taylor always rests far apart from Tyler during the day. When Taylor was shedding the other day, Tyler slowly approached and started licking Taylor's head area. Then Tyler slowly worked his head down the back of Taylor and took what appeared to be a small bite towards Taylor's lower back. Taylor snapped back at Tyler and then ran off. I see Tyler giving Taylor small licks sometimes and it looks like a mating ritual. But, when he follows up with little bites towards Taylor, I can't tell if it's normal mating aggression or male-to-male aggression that will eventually kill Taylor.

    So, to those of you who have seen two males in an enclosure together, what does the aggressiveness between males look like?

    To those of you who are mating cresties, what does the mating aggression look like?

    Thanks in advance!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Waterford, MI
    Posts
    1,055
    Thanks
    82
    Thanked 108 Times in 104 Posts

    Default

    It's a common misconception that geckos require companions. In nature, these geckos only come together to mate and that's all. They are not a communal or social species.
    Do you know Taylors weight?
    I would separate your geckos, even if you're not 100% sure Taylor is a male. Males that are housed together will certainly fight and harm or could kill one another.
    Even if Taylor is a female, your older male will mate before she is ready to breed. This can cause serious complications for the female. If she's not to appropriate weight, it could cause her to become egg bound and it could become potentially fatal.
    Kelly @ OUROBOROS EXOTICS
    Currently working with Gargoyle geckos, Crested geckos, Leachianus geckos,
    E. Agricolae and E. Vieilliardi
    Facebook.com/OuroborosGeckos
    ouroborosexotics.wix.com/geckos

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    northern IL
    Posts
    8,007
    Thanks
    112
    Thanked 978 Times in 362 Posts

    Default

    Please separate these geckos! You don't have their weights or actual ages, so whether they are males, females, or one male and one female, you shouldn't have them together. Aggression between two of like sex can very closely resemble mating so there's not really a way to tell you what you are seeing. Underscoring what Kelly said - they do not need companions!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Alberta Canada
    Posts
    2,443
    Thanks
    9
    Thanked 339 Times in 323 Posts

    Default

    Never house geckos together unless you're 100% sure both are female or they're of breeding weight, males housed together can cause fatalities and lost tails and missing toes. And with breeding pairs the female and male must be separated for a few months each year as a cool down so she stops laying and can fatten up, laying so many eggs is really tough on the females body and can cause MBD due to using all the calcium reserves for eggs. Plase have them separated immidietly
    Sam
    C.Ciliatus 4.1.4.2 E.Macularius 1.2 Lampropeltis getula floridana 0.1 Boa Constrictor Imperator 0.1
    Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/Aryas-Exotics-1841922079418266/
    Instagram: @sams_exotics

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Posts
    357
    Thanks
    28
    Thanked 37 Times in 35 Posts

    Default

    I agree with all the posts above, you should separate the two as soon as possible. If they are indeed same sex, they can and will mate which is very dangerous for the female if they aren't the right weight! I know it's already been said above but it's really important! Crested gecko breeding is not something to be taken lightly.

    "If you are new to Cresteds, you shouldn't be looking to breed them... How about getting the basics of their care and health down pat first. They really are pretty basic, but give yourself a bit of time first and be realistic about your own motivations and commitments. If after keeping them for a year or so you find that you really do enjoy keeping/caring for these animals as a hobby, then sure, look to breed them.

    Questions you need to ask yourself before this:
    * Do you have the time or space to accommodate up to 20 babies per pairing (10-12 are more realistic) for the 3-6 months it takes to get them to a salable size?
    * Do you have an outlet to sell this many babies?
    * If not, what is your contingency (can you house this many juveniles)?"

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Posts
    12
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Thanks so much for everyone's response to my questions. I separated the geckos last night.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •