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Thread: Humidity Issues

  1. #1
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    Default Humidity Issues

    Hi everyone, first post

    I have a male crested in a 12" L X 12" W X 18" H Exo Terra Terrarium. I've really been struggling keeping the humidity at a normal/stable level. Also, I'm using reti-bark substrate. Hard to maintain it at a good level since I am gone for a majority of the day.

    Suggestions? New substrate or a mister/timing system perhaps? Any other cheap DIY fixes would be awesome!

    thanks much!

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    You don.t need ti kepp the humidity all day at 60-80%. Just spray water in the night and morning it.s enough. If the humidity will drip under 40% dueing the day u.ll see that it will incrase by itself when the night is comming.

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    My recommendation would be to consider a different substrate. Repti-bark in general is not recommended for use in CG vivariums due to the higher possibility of your geckos accidentally ingesting a small piece of bark and choking on it. Aside from that, it does very little (if anything) to help you maintain humidity. I would recommend 1-2" of coconut fiber (Eco Earth) with terrarium forest moss spread on top. The moss will work wonders to maintain humidity. Mist once to twice per day, but make sure your substrate is completely dry before misting again to avoid bacteria/fungi growth.

    If you want to go above and beyond (like I do, since I live in very dry Colorado), you could also use Hydroballs + mesh screen underneath the coconut fiber and moss.

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    Easy and cheap... partially cover the screen to trap in more humidity and or add plants to create a canopy that will do the same. Just remember that any fertilizer should be removed and rinsed from plants... if you are going with live plants. I agree to get rid of the bark as a substrate.

    You can adjust the amount of screen you cover and find a good balance with little or no cost.

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    while both are good suggestions, I have crazy low relative humidity in my home and spraying barely makes a difference for more than a few minutes. You can go out and get ripped off on a "reptile" fogger or mister that lasts a year if you're lucky, or you can rig up a humidifier made for people to moisten the tank up. I made mine for about $40.
    I bought this humidifier and 3/8" plastic hose. I pressed the tube into the hole in the top of the unit and sealed it with silicon calk. There are a ton of YouTube vids that go a great job of instructing.
    You just have to keep in mind, these things are powerful as all get-out and will bring the humidity up in your tank VERY fast, so you either need to monitor it VERY closely when it is on, or get some kind of HygroTherm-type regulator that monitors and controls the unit. Also, DO NOT let this run all day, follow standard husbandry techniques (let the tank dry out during the day etc...) and don't just "set it and forget it".
    Like I said, spraying did next to nothing for me and once I hooked this up, the humidity has been on point. Just make sure you monitor it closely, VERY closely. We still spray so our guy has droplets to drink, but this is a killer way to deal with low humidity.

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