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Thread: Ruby the Garg

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    Default Ruby the Garg

    Hi so first post here, I have read these forums a long time but never needed to ask a question myself until now.

    My wife is kinda in a panic and things have not gone as expected...

    Meet Ruby (yes her shed looks really bad, it was just starting when all this happened and so she has not even tried to remove it ><)

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    Her and her sister have lived together for 3 years with no problems at all and were tank mates before we got them.

    3 nights ago I was sitting by the tank when I hear a rustling noise and a squak. I look over to see her hanging in the air with her tail in her sisters mouth. (thought it was a cricket??)
    I touch her sisters head and she lets go. One look at the bite and I "knew" her tail would fall off. No worries I thought it will regrow in time. Checked her the next day. Tail still there... that's odd maybe it was not so bad. Check her this morning and tail still there.... bite clearly very bad.

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    My vet is out of town so I could not take her yet. I have put neosporin on the tail tonight and she is in a hospital tank. I have kept Gargs and other geckos for 5+ years never seen or herd of one hold on to an injured tail. (though before this only 1 pet of mine has ever lost a tail)

    So I am looking for some advice. Rush her to vet ASAP? OR wait and see if she takes care of it herself. She is my Wife's favorite pet (well her and her sister) so not worried about the vet bill.

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    I had this happen to one of my gargs. It ended up healing almost completely. It took about six months but each time she she'd it was better. Make sure the topical antibiotic you use has no pain killers. I also picked up a small dropper of iodine solution for cleaning wounds. You will have to probably help her with the shed on the tip of the tail. Keep an eye on it and if you notice any necrosis (tissue turning black) take it to the vet ASAP as you can get a systemic infection. Hope this helps.

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    Status update: Things went for concerning to OMG overnight. So I got back from work yesterday night and the tail looked worse. Vet still out of town so I went and got some Iodine To help clean her tail this morning. Got home a few minutes ago and added a few drops to her tail and the most disgusting thing I have ever seen happened.

    CAUTION Disturbing

    What look to be fruit fly maggots started crawling out of the wound!!!!!!! My wife started to cry and freak out and to be honest so did I. had to remove what was left of the now dead tail tip cause it was full of them. Called my vet even though they are out, the receptionist got me in touch with the next closest Reptile Vet and my wife is driving there right now to get help (I had to leave for work ). They were booked full but said they would get little ruby in cause this can not wait. So off to the next town she is driving right now.

    My personal thought now is to ask them to remove her tail and help close up the wound. I personally feel this will be less hard on her than having to go though intensive wound care. Thought?

    P.s We keep all of our Reptile habitats very clean, we see the occasional fruit fly going after the gecko food, never seen anything like this. ><

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    Glad you are getting some help for Ruby. While maggots are definitely gross, they also help keep wounds clean by eating dead tissue that could otherwise be colonized by bacteria. They don't eat live tissue. So, basically, they are (in their own gross way) helping Ruby's wound to heal.

    I don't know whether the vet will try to amputate the tail or induce Ruby to drop it or to just clean it up and let it heal on its own, but, whatever happens, I hope that Ruby heals quickly.
    3.4.0 Correlophus ciliatus (crested geckos)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Treebiscuit View Post
    Glad you are getting some help for Ruby. While maggots are definitely gross, they also help keep wounds clean by eating dead tissue that could otherwise be colonized by bacteria. They don't eat live tissue. So, basically, they are (in their own gross way) helping Ruby's wound to heal.

    I don't know whether the vet will try to amputate the tail or induce Ruby to drop it or to just clean it up and let it heal on its own, but, whatever happens, I hope that Ruby heals quickly.
    Thanks for your positive thoughts . after comparing these picture to when I left. Her tail was getting visibly swollen so looked like they had followed the dieing/infected tissue up into her tail about 1/4 of an inch over night. ><

    My wife got her to the vet and their first question was can you bring her back Friday we are really busy. My wife being in mama bear mode just straight asked "Will she live that long?" The vet went "uummmm.." Took a closer look at Ruby and clarified saying " you saw maggots" after my wife described in detail the VET rapidly changed her mind. lol

    Ruby is going to have her tail removed. (I'm not sure how) and they are keeping her overnight to make sure all is well

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    Wow. That is an interesting if not disturbing turn of events. I am wondering if these where phorid fly maggots. Didn't think fruit flies or fungal gnats laid eggs in tissue. Phorid flies look a bit like the gnats but they use decaying animal tissue. Anyways, was just a thought and I am glad you are getting her fixed up. That would have freaked me out as well. Hope she is okay otherwise.

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    Tail amputation sounds like the way to go, in order to prevent systemic infection. Good job taking her to a vet. Not all maggots are helpful; some are harmful. Who knows what kind your little one had. Best get those suckers outta there.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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    *Update* Ruby is doing well. Her tail is was removed through amputation and is now almost completely healed (closed up). 1 more week of antibiotics (the vets aid didn't give them to my wife when she first went in otherwise they would be done lol) Her apatite is really low, after the antibiotics started it picked back up but is gone again. I may have to start force feeding her she is down 5-6 grams already No problem shedding thankfully.

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    Great to hear that Ruby is doing better and is shedding well! Even though the antibiotics probably made her feel much better overall by fighting the infection in her tail, they are probably also making her feel sick to her stomach -- they kill off "friendly" gut bacteria as well as bad bacteria -- so I hope her appetite will pick up after she is finished her treatment. Go Ruby!
    3.4.0 Correlophus ciliatus (crested geckos)

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