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Thread: Creepella's arachnids

  1. #1
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    Default Creepella's arachnids

    Here's the collection - so far.

    T's

    Sweet Cheeks (Lasiodora parahybana - Salmon Pink)

    She has a 6 inch legspan and an attitude to match! The common name comes from the pink bristles, which she kicks up to defend herself.


    Some people like to handle this species. I prefer to avoid being "haired" with irritating bristles - or bitten with fangs the size of cat's claws. My hand is on the *outside* of the glass.




    Olga (Lasiodorides striatus - Peruvian orange stripe)

    Olga looks more orangey in real life. She's only 2 inches now, but will grow to about 7 inches. This is a nervous, jumpy species, but would rather run than bite.


    Flash (Nhandu chromatus - Brazilian red and white)

    This baby has about an inch legspan. She will grow to about 6 inches. She's showing off her threat pose because I lifted her hide out. This species is an opportunistic burrower, especially when young.


    Rosie (Grammostola rosea - Chilean Rose)

    She's climbing out of her cage because she's miffed that I got the substrate wet while filling her water dish. She recently molted and has a lovely bright pink metallic sheen on her carapace.


    Scorps:

    Fred Flintstone (Hadrurus arizonensis - Desert Hairy)

    Fred got his name from his love of digging "gravel pits". He's entertaining to watch and a good beginner scorp. Like most scorpions, he glows under UV light.




    Barney (Babycurus gigas)
    This is a beautiful scorp, but not a species for beginners. Their venom potency is 3/5 (painful but not medically significant). These guys are fast and unpredictable. They are arboreal and require vertical surfaces and moderate humidity.


    Lovey (Damon Diadema - Tanzanian Whip Spider)
    I call her Lovey because of her heart-shaped carapace. In Spanish these animals are known as Corazon (heart). They grow to about 2 inches body length. These arachnids are harmless and fascinating to watch. They walk sideways slowly, like a crab - unless they're startled, then they can run very fast! They are arboreal cave dwellers and use their long "whip" legs to sense their environment and communicate with each other. Their clawed pedipalps are used to capture prey, like a mantis.

  2. #2
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    Default

    Nice collection.

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    Creepella (05-28-2015)

  4. #3
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    Very neat! Are Tanzanian Whip Spiders communal?
    May you take time to celebrate the quiet miracles that seek no attention.

  5. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Whimsy View Post
    Very neat! Are Tanzanian Whip Spiders communal?
    This species Damon diadema, is communal. There are other whip spider species which aren't. There are species from around the world with different attributes, like one from Cuba that's parthenogenic.

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    Whimsy (06-21-2015)

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