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Thread: Leachianus breeding

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    Question Leachianus breeding

    So this is for those who breed them in particular. When you're breeding out your pair, are you wanting to keep them pure or mixed? I know when you mix you see some awesome patterns, colors, ect. But why do you do it to keep them full blood
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    I don't breed leachies but I like pure locales. i like pure locales as I like the differences between the locales, such as some people prefer large dark colored animals like a melanistic Yate, while someone else would prefer a more colorful smaller leachie, like a nuu ami. When you mix locales you take away these locale specific traits which I think adds to the uniqueness of this species.

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    Though I've never bred leachies, I personally prefer pure bred localities.

    I do believe it is our duty to keep locality bloodlines pure for future herpetoculturists to enjoy, however I think at some point we may need to out cross locales due to the difficulty it is to obtain field collected "new blood" into the specific locales. Granted leachies are a little more on the advanced side breeding wise due to incompatible pairs and their seasonality which in turn makes this process slow. Regardless of this fact, many breeders already cross localities for the purpose of line breeding certain traits which is quite interesting and makes for some truly colorful geckos.

    Quote Originally Posted by InventorReptiles View Post
    When you mix locales you take away these locale specific traits which I think adds to the uniqueness of this species.
    ^ I agreed with this quote, but ultimately, locales may need to be crossed to maintain healthy geckos.

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    I prefer pure locale, while mixes can have cool colors and patterns I feel something is lost when they get mixed

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    Quote Originally Posted by InventorReptiles View Post
    When you mix locales you take away these locale specific traits which I think adds to the uniqueness of this species.
    you would be surprised what selective breeding can accomplish. those locales are a starting point for the desired traits. The GT groups a, b, and c as well as the pinky line of leachies are a prime example of locale mixes but were paired based on size, pattern, color, ect. Too few were collected from each locale to keep the concept of pure locals viable but selecting the traits you like and finding the individual animals to breed for it will be inevitable to avoid inbreeding. I like the greens that certain leachie locales have and am considering the cross that might bring them out. Possibly crossing the nuu ami mossy green color to the pale green from the bayonnaise local or maybe a GTBxbayonn. though trying yo mix the more purple pigment of the bayonnaise with the yellow spots of the nuu ami rather than the pink/white they normally show. one of the gecko symposiums touched on it where trait standards are going to be more important than "locale" and would be less likely to risk healthy genetics.

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    Quote Originally Posted by InventorReptiles View Post
    i like pure locales as I like the differences between the locales, such as some people prefer large dark colored animals like a melanistic Yate, while someone else would prefer a more colorful smaller leachie, like a nuu ami. When you mix locales you take away these locale specific traits which I think adds to the uniqueness of this species.
    Quote Originally Posted by MACHI_vallism View Post
    I prefer pure locale, while mixes can have cool colors and patterns I feel something is lost when they get mixed
    I concur with the above posts.
    I've chosen to breed pure locale pairs because of these reasons stated above.
    I don't dislike any mixed locale by any stretch, and 99% are are visually more striking because of it. I just prefer the uniqueness that each different locale possesses...that the reason that have locales after all, because they're different.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dragoon View Post
    you would be surprised what selective breeding can accomplish. those locales are a starting point for the desired traits. The GT groups a, b, and c as well as the pinky line of leachies are a prime example of locale mixes but were paired based on size, pattern, color, ect. Too few were collected from each locale to keep the concept of pure locals viable but selecting the traits you like and finding the individual animals to breed for it will be inevitable to avoid inbreeding. I like the greens that certain leachie locales have and am considering the cross that might bring them out. Possibly crossing the nuu ami mossy green color to the pale green from the bayonnaise local or maybe a GTBxbayonn. though trying yo mix the more purple pigment of the bayonnaise with the yellow spots of the nuu ami rather than the pink/white they normally show. one of the gecko symposiums touched on it where trait standards are going to be more important than "locale" and would be less likely to risk healthy genetics.
    Well I'd like to point out the GT types A, C, & D aren't neccessarily "prime examples of locale mixes", but more of pure locales themselves.
    Type - A Leachies are typically pure Poindimie, Mt. Humboldt, Yate, and Mt. Koghis, with the exception of some being GT locale X GT locale that isn't typically readily recognizable as being crossed.
    Type - B Leachies are typically GT crosses of two or more GT locales, and the occasional GT x Henkeli(island) crosses.
    Type - C Lechies are unicorns. There were only 2 F1's ever imported, and they were both owned by Phil Tremper. Since then, one has passed away, leaving a sole Type-C survivor. There are only a few rumored handful of Type-C crosses from Phil also. Very, very rare.
    Type - D Leachies consist of the smaller GT locales, ie: Rivière Bleue, and I believe Mt. Dore locales. Also very, very rare.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Metal_Gecko View Post
    Well I'd like to point out the GT types A, C, & D aren't neccessarily "prime examples of locale mixes", but more of pure locales themselves.
    Type - A Leachies are typically pure Poindimie, Mt. Humboldt, Yate, and Mt. Koghis, with the exception of some being GT locale X GT locale that isn't typically readily recognizable as being crossed.
    Type - B Leachies are typically GT crosses of two or more GT locales, and the occasional GT x Henkeli(island) crosses.
    Type - C Lechies are unicorns. There were only 2 F1's ever imported, and they were both owned by Phil Tremper. Since then, one has passed away, leaving a sole Type-C survivor. There are only a few rumored handful of Type-C crosses from Phil also. Very, very rare.
    Type - D Leachies consist of the smaller GT locales, ie: Rivière Bleue, and I believe Mt. Dore locales. Also very, very rare.
    You seem to have a lot of knowledge about these animals. Could you enlighten me with some more information? I have some questions.
    1. have you ever seen any certificate for legal collection and export from New Caledonia for any of the supposedly "pure locales" you mentioned as "Type As"?
    2. do you have any proof for saying that "Type B" leachianus are GTxGT crosses or even GTxOffshore? I know several people who have wild caught GT animals that don't fit in any of the other categories and thus can be called "Type B". Patterned, blotched GTs. Never have i understood the differentiation of patterned GTs into the "B,C,D" types.
    3. Where did you get your information about the "Type Cs" from? Phil Tremper has wild caught animals and they are both still alive. There are pure offsprings around, all staying smaller than that huge female.
    4. Have you ever seen some proof for the locale of the Riviere Bleues? You should investigate around and you might find things that aren't too positive for anyone of us who keeps Riviere Bleue and thinks that they are a real locale. They aren't that rare and expensive anymore, by the way, for said reasons. Also, i doubt that "Type D" is a necessary category for this system, since neither of us could tell a "Riviere Bleue" apart from a "Type B" apart from a large Isle de Pines specimen. I also suppose you made up that thing with the Mt. Dores being "Type D" on your own. If not, please let me know any reasons for that.

    Please don't get me wrong in correcting you, but there's already enoug rumor and hearsay around with these animals, we don't need too much more of that.
    Regards,

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    Quote Originally Posted by Koghis View Post
    You seem to have a lot of knowledge about these animals. Could you enlighten me with some more information? I have some questions.
    Eh, not a professional or anything, just information I've picked over the years...
    Quote Originally Posted by Koghis View Post
    1. have you ever seen any certificate for legal collection and export from New Caledonia for any of the supposedly "pure locales" you mentioned as "Type As"? ]
    No, obviously not...and I suppose neither have you... you know, since they aren't legal to be field collected and exported anymore.
    Quote Originally Posted by Koghis View Post
    2. do you have any proof for saying that "Type B" leachianus are GTxGT crosses or even GTxOffshore? I know several people who have wild caught GT animals that don't fit in any of the other categories and thus can be called "Type B". Patterned, blotched GTs. Never have i understood the differentiation of patterned GTs into the "B,C,D" types.
    No, not so much proof, as I have a pretty good base-line of information at my disposal.
    This isn't concrete either, but it's straight from the mouth of Phillipe De Vosjoli, so if you think you know more than him, then more power to you bro.
    Anyways, here's a good start of learning for ya:
    http://www.giantgeckos.net/giantgeck...d=14&Itemid=50
    Quote Originally Posted by Koghis View Post
    3. Where did you get your information about the "Type Cs" from? Phil Tremper has wild caught animals and they are both still alive. There are pure offsprings around, all staying smaller than that huge female.
    Where? Well NOT from Phil Tremper himself, but from a mutual friend of ours who breeds out many Leachies and Trachys. Also talked to the Hampers this past weekend about Phil Tremper's original and only Type-C pair, and how one of the 2 had passed. To the knowledge of myself and everyone I have talked to on the subject, the Type-c offspring he has/had are GT crosses.
    Quote Originally Posted by Koghis View Post
    4. Have you ever seen some proof for the locale of the Riviere Bleues? You should investigate around and you might find things that aren't too positive for anyone of us who keeps Riviere Bleue and thinks that they are a real locale. They aren't that rare and expensive anymore, by the way, for said reasons. Also, i doubt that "Type D" is a necessary category for this system, since neither of us could tell a "Riviere Bleue" apart from a "Type B" apart from a large Isle de Pines specimen. I also suppose you made up that thing with the Mt. Dores being "Type D" on your own. If not, please let me know any reasons for that.
    This one has to be my favorite of the condecending questions/statements you've lobbed at me.
    I'm not sure again of what "proof" you are looking for, BUT New Caledonia is a real place, with a real location called Rivière Bleue, on the mainland, with real live Rhacodactylus leachianus in it, so one with any sort of intelligence might begin to assume that you could collect an animal from said locale, and even name it after said location...maybe?
    As far as the Type-D thing goes, I'm sure that 4th designation was reserved for them and other GT's that don't neccessarily fit into the "typical GT" genre of Leachianus? Dunno, because I wasn't the originator of said labeling.
    Also, I dunno about you, but if you claim to know as much about the Rivière Bleue locale as you claim, then you should EASILY be able to tell the difference between them and GT Type-A, and Isle of Pines locales... and furthermore, why are you disputing them as a locale if you acknowledge their existence???
    Glad you think I'm just making $h!t up with the whole Mt. dore thing, you know, cause I was wrong about Type-D and all...LOL
    Again, more literature for you to read about GT Type-D and also the Mt. Dore locale:
    http://www.forums.repashy.com/showthread.php?t=41635
    http://www.forums.repashy.com/showthread.php?t=41682

    For the record, I own at least one of each locale from the mainland except a Poindimiè and/or a Mt. Humboldt, and my business partner owns quite a few Henkeli, GTs, and GT crosses. So I have quite a bit my disposal for visual comparison.
    Anymore questions, or information you'd like to badger outta me on a public forum?

    "Regards"
    Last edited by Metal_Gecko; 02-23-2014 at 02:42 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Koghis View Post
    They aren't that rare and expensive anymore, by the way
    While we're at it, since they're so cheap and common now, could you provide me with the name and contact info of any Rivière Bleue for sale?
    As I'd love to purchase a female to pair up with mine...

    Yeah, thanks.
    4.3.0 Rhacodactylus leachianus - Yatè, Mt. Koghis, Rivière Bleue, purple Nuu Ana, Poindimiè
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    The funny thing is that you can't get them from steve anymore, and you can guess why.. But that does not matter now. Drop me a PM, i can give you some names, but they are all out of the US. I can do a yate x koghis cross, too, if i want, and then say it's a fancy and rare new locale that no one has Thanks for not answering any of my other questions.

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