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Thread: New garg not so great

  1. #11
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    I'd need to see a radiograph (x-ray) to be certain, but I think you are likely dealing with fractures of the back secondary to metabolic bone disease. If the animal is walking and assuming that diet and husbandry are correct, the situation should stabilize although permanent, visible kinking (It's called kyphosis) will be appatent.
    ~Alan

    "You know, one of the hardest parts of my job is to connect Iraq to the war on terror."
    President Geo. W Bush in an interview with CBS News, Washington D.C., Sept. 6, 2006

  2. #12
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    Thanks doc. I am assuming that the breeder I bought him from bought him from the herp distributer he worked for. No telling what the husbandry was before he got him. He feeds GGD and dusted crix. I do the same. The little guy ate like a champ yesterday. I haven't seen any gecko suck down the food like that before except for my 42 gram female that I swear is part hoover!

    Ok, lets assume that it is broken 2nd to MBD. He is only 7 grams. With proper care I can get his Ca levels corrected and no futher damage will be done. Will he be breedable because this is an environmental condition and will pass or is it more like he has a pre-disposition for MBD and should not be bred for the risk of passing the pre-disposition?

    Also, what can I do for him other than general good care and watch for a Ca crash? Should he be allowed to climb like a normal auric, should I give the liquid Ca for a while to build him up? He moves pretty normal. His rear legs are a little odd, kind of splayed or too far forward. He climbed up my arm ok though, just not very fast. Do you think this is painful? Am I being cruel keeping him alive? I know this is speculation since you haven't examined him, but advice would be helpful. We are having an ice storm here and I can't take him anywhere till probably Tuesday.

    BTW-I named him Jake. Like Jake Gyllenhaal in Brokeback Mountain. Lame huh!? I figure he is so sad, a humorous name was in order.
    Suzanne
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  3. #13
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    Bleeding sarcasm has the same thing with two of their aurics.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4minters View Post
    With proper care I can get his Ca levels corrected and no futher damage will be done. Will he be breedable because this is an environmental condition and will pass or is it more like he has a pre-disposition for MBD and should not be bred for the risk of passing the pre-disposition?
    MBD is not genetic and there is no reason that (other problems nothwthstanding) he should not be bred. You're caring and cognizant of requirements. Offspring of a breeding from this one should be genetically normal.
    ~Alan

    "You know, one of the hardest parts of my job is to connect Iraq to the war on terror."
    President Geo. W Bush in an interview with CBS News, Washington D.C., Sept. 6, 2006

  5. #15
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    I would like to explore the genetics of this issue. I have 2 females that exibit this.. kinky/twisted trait. One of which gave me a fertile clutch [the other i think is a hybrid or a hermaphrodite or something] a few days ago, one of the eggs hatched, huge, normal, beautiful. Today, I woke up to the second one with its head sticking out of the egg. I snapped a few shots, and walked away, planning to come back in a few hours. 4 hours later, it was still laying in the egg, head sticking out. I pulled it out of the egg the rest of the way. It had issues walking, but I didnt think anything more then "oh its new, doesnt have its feet right yet" then.. later my boyfriend came home, and i pulled out the new clutch to show him, and then i noticed this baby was definitely different.

    For the record, the clutch had imperfect calcification, and i assumed they were bad, but never tossed them, because they were her first clutch, but after months and months, it was aparent that there was something growing inside.

    Still dont think theres something in the water? [chevron caught on fire this morning, and they sounded the alarms for everyone to lock them selves in thier house, btw] hahha, actually, i doubt water is the case here, since the mother exibits the same traits. The only thing dramaticly different that ive done, is my incubation temperatures have dropped, almost 10 degrees. I havent lost any babies, but they do take 4-5 months to hatch, and I am having all these problems...

    Here is the normal clutchmate:

    Here is "Toad" [we nammed it.]





    Here is what mommy looks like:


    and here is a gargoyle with FTS, so you can see what one looks like.


    Originally, when you contacted me, the points that i made were.. Take it into a vet, if the tail was kinked/zig zaging, then that would point to calcium deficency as being an issue, and before you see a vet, and instead of immeditely pumping it full of extra calcium/multivitamins, start small like adding uvb, and feeding some papaya. That was assuming it was mbd related, and before i saw the pictures. And i agreed with dr alan, if it is calcium related, then when they overcome it, it shouldnt be a problem.

    However, now that i have hatched out toad, or mini twisty, I am not so sure, and... looking at the pictures, id say thats exactly what my geckos have, and even if hes 100% healthy, i dont think he will ever look "normal" and there is obviously a possibility that it IS genetic, and so its better NOT to breed him.

    I still think you should take him to a vet, do determine weather or not he is calcium deficent, and maybe Dr Alan can provide other questions/tests you should request from your vet that will prove to be helpful.


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