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Thread: Phrynocephalus mystaceus

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    Default Phrynocephalus mystaceus

    I've been keeping these guys since May of this year. Certainly one of the most interesting species of agamids I have worked with. Their "personalities" rival any bearded dragon or Uromastyx I've seen. I'm keeping a group inside and setting some up outside as well. Hopefully, I have breeding success with this species next year. Not too many people in the US are working with this species, so it's be nice to see some CB babies regularly offered. They appear quite hardy, with my limited experience.
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    CrowTRobot (11-13-2012),GeckoJosh (11-12-2012),Hannibal (11-11-2012),TheLizardKing (11-14-2012)

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    Welcome to Pangea! Very interesting species; keep us updates on how they do for you. Would definitely like to see more of these guys in the hobby.

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    They are so interesting looking and very pretty as well. I cant get over their cute piggy style nose. Its so cool seeing how that works for them to with the picture of one of them buried. I hope your successful with them. Also what do you mean by "Their "personalities" rival any bearded dragon or Uromastyx". Are they calm or cuddly ?? .
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    No, I wouldn't suggest holding them, not calm or cuddly if you attempt to. I'm not really advocating holding any reptile, but that is another discussion. They will eat from their hands, however, and are not afraid. I talking more about the way they run around their cage and the way they move their tails like scorpions talking back and forth with each other. Certainly more interesting in their behavior.

    Quote Originally Posted by GeckoLove86 View Post
    They are so interesting looking and very pretty as well. I cant get over their cute piggy style nose. Its so cool seeing how that works for them to with the picture of one of them buried. I hope your successful with them. Also what do you mean by "Their "personalities" rival any bearded dragon or Uromastyx". Are they calm or cuddly ?? .

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    They use their tails to communicate? That would be really neat to see. Beardies and Uros are such placid lumps and are hardly active in their enclosures, so this would be a cool alternative for someone who wants a desert-type display pet.

    What are the care specs? UVB, temps, enclosure size?
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    Yep, I'll need to upload a video to YouTube. These guys run around all day long, bury in the sand in such a unique way. They go into the sand with this awesome quick side to side motion, often just leaving their head above ground. At night they completely bury themselves in the sand, it's so odd to look in the enclosure and see nothing in there. They make some pretty wonderful displays, I'd like to see more of them in some zoos.

    Pretty easy to care for, feeds primariy on mealworm larva, mealworm beetles, as well as just mealworms. I suppliment with crickets and waxworms. I'm sure they'd take juv cockroaches as well. They eat just a little bit of spinach occasionally, I've been meaning to try some other greens.

    Size wise, I'm sure they'd like at min. a 20 gallon long, but really I wouldn't go smaller then a 40 gal breeder for a pair. They really appreciate front opening enclosures, easier to interact and feed them. They don't really like hands reaching from above, but don't mind them coming in from the sides.

    They like strong UV, I use mercury vapor bulbs. I try to keep a hot spot in the cage of about 110-120 degrees. A temp gun comes in useful because they also appreciate a cooler areamo the enclosure closer to 75 degree.

    These guys really love SAND! At least 4-6" of it.


    Quote Originally Posted by LCH View Post
    They use their tails to communicate? That would be really neat to see. Beardies and Uros are such placid lumps and are hardly active in their enclosures, so this would be a cool alternative for someone who wants a desert-type display pet.

    What are the care specs? UVB, temps, enclosure size?

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    so cool! if their availability rises, i might be tempted....

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    Yeah, they aren't so easy to acquire. I got a few earlier this year from a friend who brought them from Europe. To get more I had to import a large group myself. The only ones I've really seen available in the US, other then a single male earlier this year that came from Reptile Industries that they picked up in Europe. One guy in the USA offered a few CB babies, and hopefully I can add my name to that list next year. I guess we'll see.

    Quote Originally Posted by post2post36 View Post
    so cool! if their availability rises, i might be tempted....

  10. #9
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    this is the first time i'm seeing/hearing about them. are they more commonplace in Europe, or still an abstract species?

  11. #10
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    Wow, very cool. I would love to see a video of these guys if you get around to posting one.

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