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Thread: My First Pet T :) Brazilian Giant Salmon Birdeater

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    Thumbs up My First Pet T :) Brazilian Giant Salmon Birdeater

    I care for T's at the zoo, roaches and scorpions as well, but this is my first pet T. Go big or go home, right? I bought the lil guy from Exotic Kingdom, and he says it will be full grown (8 inches) in a year and a half!!

    Brazilian Salmon Pink Bird-eating Tarantula (Lasiodora parahybana)
    "Hunter"

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    Pretty cool little bugger Emily congrats
    Gargoyle Gecko 3.1.2, Pygmy Mice (lots)
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    Full grown for those suckers is more like 11"! That's for males though, they are more spindly. A female will have more bulk and be less leggy so 8" is possible. It's also possible to get them there that quickly, but more realistically you are looking at ~3 years I would think if it's a female. A male that was power fed, and supplied a little more heat than room temp though.... of course if you did that to a male you are shortening his life span.

    I would power feed to get it up to around 2" or so to get it out of the (very) delicate sling phase though. At least that's what I do with mine, and I've lost very few slings.

    Either way, nice pick up!

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    Tiger Cowboy, what do you mean by powerfeeding?

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    I'm super jealous!!! Congrats on the new interesting addition
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nismo400rgtr View Post
    Tiger Cowboy, what do you mean by powerfeeding?
    Power feeding for a T involves feeding as much as the T will take as often as it will take it, and providing some supplemental heat. All tarantula species currently in the hobby will thrive at room temperature, but a little bit warmer (80's very low 90's) will speed up their metabolism a good bit. T's are fairly efficient converting food to growth so the faster the metabolism, and the more you feed, the faster they will grow. Typically an appropriately sized cricket or two every day or every other day with the temps described above would be considered power feeding.

    Species that are known to grow fast (such as the L. parahybana above) will grow VERY fast, and with some species known for slow growth (most of the Aphonopelma, Grammostola, and Brachypelma genera for instance) it will result in a somewhat increased growth rate, though still slow.

    There are advantages to doing this. One is that slings are very delicate up to about 2" or so and power feeding can get them out of this stage quickly. It also has the advantage of bringing adult coloration to a rather drab (in many cases) sling more quickly. It could also possibly result in a larger adult size though this is more speculative than truly tested.

    There are disadvantages as well. Temps have to be pretty well controlled. A tarantula can handle colder temps much easier than higher temps, and with a sling sized enclosure there will not be room for much variation. Also, you are shortening the lifespan of the tarantula; at least in males, with females it may or may not matter.

    This is because once a male reaches what's called his "ultimate" molt he is both ready to breed and living on borrow time. Typically an ultimate male will not live more than a year. They could possibly live to try for a post-ultimate molt, but it is almost always a suicidal molt due to the damage caused during the molt. I had Tapinauchenius violaceus (Purple Tree Spider) try for one and as best I can tell made it through the molt, but he bled to death (as much as you can call it bleeding, hemolymphing to death lacks something) when his pedipalps were torn off in the process. All that to say you might have a male with a life expectancy of 5 years or so (reasonable for many species) at a consistent, though not fast, feeding rate and room temps. You can ramp him up to mature in a year for example, but at most you could expect maybe one more year out of him. For a breeder this might be fine. Great even; if they time it just right for one of their girls. For the average keeper though you've lost your pet all to soon.

    Girls on the other hand live much longer in all species. While you might shorten the lives of some arboreals (which tend to have a lower life expectancy as a general rule), for some terrestrials (such as the genera described above) it would hardly matter as some females can live 30+ years (though that is exceptional). There are some people who think some in those genera could live to see 50 or 60 even. We just don't know as captive bred tarantulas are to new to have seen one go that long.

    *Added info* There is also thought that providing more space, within reason, will help a sling grow faster. I don't quite follow the rational behind it like I do the feeding though. At best you get a larger spider. At worst you have a sling that can stretch it's legs a little more. Up to you.

    Long answer to a simple question but I think that covers it pretty well.
    Last edited by Tiger Cowboy; 11-23-2011 at 02:01 AM. Reason: Picky about sci. names, improving readability, adding info

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    Awesome Emily!! Will you post pics as she grows?
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    Absolutely

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    I just got my first T, also a L. para, a few months ago. Was 1/2inch when I got him/her, and she just recently came out of her second molt. I'd say she's a little over an inch now.

    I upgraded her to her next size deli-cup, although spends most of her time in a burrow now.
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    Long answer appreciated Tiger cowboy!

    Thanks

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