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Thread: When Superworms become beetles....

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    Default When Superworms become beetles....

    Are they edible? I found one in a tank last night, two fat-tails spit it out and so did an adult chahoua (that will readily take pinkie mice). Anyone know about these buggers?

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    They turn into beetles? Do the beetles fly? How long did it take for a superworm to turn into a beetle? (sorry for all the questions).
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    Quote Originally Posted by gecko_newbie
    They turn into beetles? Do the beetles fly? How long did it take for a superworm to turn into a beetle? (sorry for all the questions).
    Inch-long, black beetles with a funny smell (possibly a defense mechanism?) no flying, but it probably took about a month? It was in a tank.

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    I've read a few things on superworms and they sound hard to breed. They talk about having to keep the worms individually in tiny containers till they pupate. Sounds like too much work. How do you do it?

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    I've haven't gotten, but one meal worm to become a beatle and it was soon missing from the tank. Fire skinks at least, will eat them
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    Mealworms are simple. Just leave the container out for a few weeks and make sure they get food and water. You'll start seeing the little pupae in there. Remove them and put them in a second container with a papertowel. When they come out as beetles, put them into a third container with bedding. Just don't get the giant mealworms. I bought some, they got mold on them so I wasn't about to feed them to my beardie so I waited for them to pupate. Apparently the giants are giant because they have a chemical on them to keep them from pupating. Well, they eventually did but the beetles that came out were half formed. The back end under the wings was still pupae and they started eating each other even though they were bedded on oatmeal and i was feeding them the cricket grains and water gels. I threw them out into my compost pile.

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    Yep, they turn into beetles. My beardie loves'em! Especially seems to be satisfied with the crunch.
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    Quote Originally Posted by 789
    Mealworms are simple. Just leave the container out for a few weeks and make sure they get food and water. You'll start seeing the little pupae in there. Remove them and put them in a second container with a papertowel. When they come out as beetles, put them into a third container with bedding. Just don't get the giant mealworms. I bought some, they got mold on them so I wasn't about to feed them to my beardie so I waited for them to pupate. Apparently the giants are giant because they have a chemical on them to keep them from pupating. Well, they eventually did but the beetles that came out were half formed. The back end under the wings was still pupae and they started eating each other even though they were bedded on oatmeal and i was feeding them the cricket grains and water gels. I threw them out into my compost pile.
    Argh! I don't want to raise them, I was just asking if they are edible because I had 3 animals spit it out like it was poison! I wound up giving it to the beardies and assume one of them ate it. And they are superworms and certainly can turn into beetles... big black ones!

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    Superworm (Zoophobus) beetles have that disgusting odor they use as a defence. The only reptiles I've ever witnessed eating them are the garbage cans - beardies. They eat anything, can't have any taste buds

    The beetles can fly, they don't very often but they can. I've seen it a few times over the 10 or so years that I've been breeding them. The first time was when a beetle hitched a ride on my sleeve. As I went to pick him off, he flew away. It's a rather loud 'buzz' for a beetle that size, reminds me of the noise from June bugs.

    Supers are easy to breed but as mentioned, they do need to be able to find a private area to pupate. I use those plastic organizer boxes with 2 tiny holes drilled in the lid above each compartment. One full grown big juicy worm and a bit of substrate per compartment, leave in a warm spot (not hot, just warm), about 2 weeks or so later you find pupae. Time depends on how mature the worms were but usually 2 weeks is about right. Beetles are ready in about another 2 weeks, again depending on temperature.

    If your mealworm (T. molitor) beetles morph half eaten, check for grain mites. That's usually the first sign of substrate problems coming up. Another reason is not enough moisture for the worms and/or other beetles. They'll chew each other to bits if they are thirsty. Beetles and worms can escape, leaving you still thirsty but pupae are sitting ducks, great targets for a bit of moist flesh.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Silly-atus

    The beetles can fly
    Oh dear I hate flying insects and I have (for the first time ever) a 2 - 3 week old container of thriving superworms right now. I need to start feeding them off!
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