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Thread: "perfect diet"

  1. #11
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    Do rhacs really lick up calcium? I know leos and AFTs do, but not those.

    IMO, there's no perfect diet, only what we feel is best for them. That may be Repashy CGD, or your own personal blend, or mashed fruit and insects.

    Repashy CGD has LOTS of research behind it, so most people feel it's the most. IMO, unless you know what you're doing for the most part and have been working with rhacs for quite a while, CGD is all you need, as it's formulated to be complete.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrEyebrows View Post
    A MRP can only be perfect if you can force an ideal consumption rate for an individual based on weight, exercise, and nutritional needs. This is why we see overweight crested geckos because diet changes based on metabolic need so consumption must be monitored.
    I don't know how long you've been into rhacodactylus geckos, but I really don't see that many overweight geckos. Sure, they are out there, but it's not like every adult gecko is bound to become overweight based on cgd consumption. I've never had an overweight crested gecko, but I am gecko-sitting an r. sarasinorum that could probably be classified that way.

    I think you are suggesting a diet cgd formula with this post? I just don't see the point, really. I've been around a while, and I think it's just easier to feed an "overweight" gecko less. Who even determines if a gecko is overweight or not?


    Quote Originally Posted by MrEyebrows View Post
    If a gecko is overconsuming CGD, is it possible to over dose the vitamin supplements, specifically vitamin D?
    Any gecko, regardless of weight, can overdose on Vit D. But you don't have to worry about that with cgd - the ratio is perfect and I don't think any gecko has ever overdosed on any nutrient or vitamin that has been eating the cgd.


    Quote Originally Posted by MrEyebrows View Post
    Should there be multiple diets available for the different life stages... higher protein for juveniles, higher calcium for breeding females?
    There used to be separate diets for gargs and leachies. The garg diet had more protein, so for a while, people would feed it to their juveniles. No one really noticed a growth difference. We have done studies on our small gecko population, and even supplimenting roaches on a regular basis does not seem to make them grow that much faster. I don't think that anyone should push young geckos to grow in the first place. Look at great danes - they cannot be fed puppy food because they grow too quickly and develop bone deformaties. Shouldn't young geckos grow at a slower rate anyway, to make sure they are healthy? I mean, we don't push our kids to grow quickly. As long as the species in question is getting the proper nutrients and vitamins, nature should just take its course.

    As for breeding females, some people do suppliment more calcium. After our chahoua and leachianus geckos lay eggs, they get adult dubia roaches heavily dusted with ICB, to make sure any calcium that was lost in the egg making/laying processes is replaced. But the truth is, crested gecko females do just fine getting regular cgd even if they are making/laying eggs. You almost never hear of a female calcium crashing after eggs. I'm not saying it doesn't happen, but there are thousands of females out there laying eggs, and it's just not a common happening. It is common for chahoua and sarasinorum to have kinky tails after laying, but a little extra calcium straightens it right out. It's really just not an issue with cresteds.

    And how exactly do you decide when a gecko isn't a juvenile anymore? It takes my crested geckos about 2 years to mature, when it takes other people's geckos sometimes half that to reach the same weight. Many people who live in the midwest will report slower growing geckos, even when temps, setups, and feeding regimens are the same. Are you suggesting there should be a midwest-dwelling gecko diet as well?

    If you want an obese gecko diet, who's to say the gecko is obese? What about a diet for "elderly" geckos. Who's going to determine the age when a gecko becomes elderly, when we don't really fully understand the lifespan of these guys in the first place?



    I guess my point in all this is that I just don't understand why some people want to make life harder than it is. The cgd is simple, it works for all rhacodactylus geckos. It's constantly being updated and improved. Why not just accept it as it is? Why worry about life stages, when there really isn't any reason to worry? It's clear, Mr. Eyebrows, that you do not like the cgd, since you have made multiple posts on it. Have your geckos had some sort of problem? Have you addressed all the other factors that aren't related to diet, such as housing and humidity?

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrEyebrows View Post
    A MRP can only be perfect if you can force an ideal consumption rate for an individual based on weight, exercise, and nutritional needs. This is why we see overweight crested geckos because diet changes based on metabolic need so consumption must be monitored.
    The MRP is only one tool (in this case, a very beneficial tool!) used in keeping these animals. It's not perfect, but there are no perfect commercial foods for any animal, humans included. I believe it has the necessary amounts of macro nutrition and adequate levels of micro nutrition. I think the ratios of macro nutrients can be further tweaked but that's really based on Allen Repashy's studies and feedback from the wide user base. Micro nutrients can always be added or supplemented as needed.

    A commercial diet can't be "perfect" because individual organisms are going to be different. That's where the observation skills of the pet owner comes in; even with the best dog food you feed to the condition of the animal, and not 100% by specific amounts of food. If you have a gecko that has problems processing calcium (by genetics or due to past nutritional imbalance) then you should provide additional calcium in some form, whether through dusting feeders or by adding some to the food, water or direct feeding.

    If you have a gecko that has constant shed issues, it may be beneficial to give additional Repashy SuperVite for the vitamin A boost during sheds. Etc. etc.!

    If a gecko is overconsuming CGD, is it possible to over dose the vitamin supplements, specifically vitamin D?
    If it's being fed as directed (mixed with water), I do not believe this is possible for reptiles. Everything gets processed together; unless there was an innate imbalance in the food (like too much Vitamin A or D which are fat soluble). The amount of food they can eat will increase as they grow, and more fat cells to safely store the excess, etc. I do not know if this is true at all, it's just my own reasoning and it may be completely false. I don't think that they could take in enough of the food over time for it to become a problem.

    Should there be multiple diets available for the different life stages... higher protein for juveniles, higher calcium for breeding females?
    I think we need more studies to determine the active metabolic rates at life stages, but again it's hard to define the transition from juvenile to adult. This is why we need to feed to the condition of the animal. Since we don't know the effects of "power feeding" it's probably best to avoid giving juveniles too much protein within the diet, and let them "self regulate" with the amount of insects they eat.

    Anecdotally, we hear that juves are more inclined to hunt bugs so we conclude that it is a survival mechanism to grow big fast. However, nature doesn't favor HEALTHY, nature favors fast to breed and gives no regard to long life in non-communal animals. Conjectural theory is that elephants, cetaceans, apes and humans have an edge because our societies promote longer life through wise, non-breeding adults. I digress...

    I think that any pet owner needs to read up on nutrition and provide their pet what's needed. An MRP that provides the majority of what they need and additional supplementation as necessary is the easiest route.
    Specializing in Crested Geckos
    Working with Uromastyx | Uroplatus | PI Chahoua
    Also keeping: Australian Shepherds (Chester & Sadie)
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  4. #14
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    I just want to clarify that I love CGD, I actually work in the pet trade and sell it like crazy. I just am a fan of side projects and new ideas. My goal is nowhere near a smear campaign or trying to rid the world of Mr Repashy, I just like to discuss these kinds of things.

    just read this http://www.store.repashy.com/reptile...-products.html
    and definitely shows very little chance of OD vit D unless you oversupplement additionally with dust

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