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Thread: breeding seasons?

  1. #1
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    Question breeding seasons?

    So I want to start breeding cresties either this year or next year, I've been doing constant research on it and have had cresties for about 4 years now so I've got almost everything down pack. The only thing I don't know about is the breeding seasons.

    I read alot on hear and noticed alot of you talking about breeding seasons. so I just have a few questions on them.

    How long are they?
    Around what tyme of the year do you end a breeeding season?
    When do you start back up?
    how do you go about ending it?

    Any of those answers and/or extra info would be great!

    Thanks in advance!
    2.1.0 Cresties 0.0.1 Gargoyle 1.0.0 Leopard gecko 0.1.0 Cornsnake 0.0.1 Columbian Tegu 1.1.0 Dogs 1.2.0 Cats 1.0.0 Chinchilla 0.1.0 banded king snake 0.1.0 california kingsnake
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  2. #2
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    Most people stick to breeding within the naturally occurring seasons. Early to mid spring people will start introducing males and females. They will also raise the temps their geckos are being kept at to the mid to upper 70's. You are looking at anywhere from 5-8 months of laying from a female give or take. Mine averaged 6 clutches before stopping on their own but they can go more. By the end of the season fall/winter has begun and the naturally cooling weather will help halt the females egg laying so she can have a good break and recover her reserves through the winter. Temps are allowed to dropped in the room to the upper 60s low 70s. After winter the cycle repeats again in the spring.

    A little side note, they will breed anytime of the year, but most people avoid this because they have a harder time getting them to stop laying eggs in the middle of the summer warmth (if they started early). Some breeders will vary a little here and there with their start or stop time, but generally speaking most breeders stick to breeding between spring and fall.

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    Awesome, thank you! I guess this means I'll start breeding NEXT year =)
    2.1.0 Cresties 0.0.1 Gargoyle 1.0.0 Leopard gecko 0.1.0 Cornsnake 0.0.1 Columbian Tegu 1.1.0 Dogs 1.2.0 Cats 1.0.0 Chinchilla 0.1.0 banded king snake 0.1.0 california kingsnake
    R.I.P frogbutt, medusa, horus, and vyktor

  4. #4
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    Actually I do have one question. if I was to get a breeding pair at the expo this month would it be possible to start breeding this year?
    2.1.0 Cresties 0.0.1 Gargoyle 1.0.0 Leopard gecko 0.1.0 Cornsnake 0.0.1 Columbian Tegu 1.1.0 Dogs 1.2.0 Cats 1.0.0 Chinchilla 0.1.0 banded king snake 0.1.0 california kingsnake
    R.I.P frogbutt, medusa, horus, and vyktor

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    Hi,
    To answer your last question, you could feasibly still breed your new pair this
    year. Sometimes however, it takes a while for a new pair to be successful in
    producing viable eggs, especially if they haven't been together or are proven
    breeders. Good that you are doing research, and that you have had Crested Geckos
    for a while.
    Best of luck. Melissa N.

    Melissa N.

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    Also you have to consider something, you will need to QT your geckos from one another, esp if they come from 2 different breeders, and even if from the same breeder. Sometimes illness can take awhile to show and the stress of a show or a new environment can bring that you. You will also want to insure your geckos are eating well before breeding.

    In all honest I would maybe wait until next season before letting them breed because starting later in the season doesnt mean your female will stop when it cools down, she may still continue to breed. And if she doesnt get enough good downtime from breeding, she wont be ready for it the following season. Also if youre willing to wait until next year, you will be able to get even nicer looking geckos for a better price as the older the females are, the more expensive they are. So if instead you buy a female in the 15-20g range she should be plenty large enough for breeding next year, cost a few bucks less then a fully mature female. So the money you would save would allow you to invest in higher quality animals because even a mature OK female will run you $100, a nice female will be $200 or more, a fantastic female will push you $300 or more. And the same goes for the male, just because he can run cheaper, by buying a younger male you can buy a better quality for a lower price then if you bought the same quality as a fully mature male.
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