Results 1 to 2 of 2

Thread: INDEPENDENT TRAITS!

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    3,983
    Thanks
    30
    Thanked 102 Times in 77 Posts

    Arrow INDEPENDENT TRAITS!

    Welcome to the wonderful world of traits! Traits are basically the genetic spices of life, when it comes to cresties, and everything that can be inherited and reproduced is a trait. Colors, Pattern, Structure; it's all tied together in the crazy world of dominant, recessive, independent and everything you read when researching or participating in these practices. Every morph we establish is a description of the way these characteristics have commonly come together to display the beauty we have all come to love!

    By themselves all traits are independent when it comes to cresties at this point. Its when traits come together in specific combinations that are consistently reproduced by breeding projects that they typically become morphs. Thats not to say that a singular trait can not reach morph status but it takes a highly developed, produced, popular trait that is widespread to reach that level on its own. At this level the trait is Independent and also a Morph. Its also common for Morphs that come from the specific combinations to include other traits in their appearence. Their presence or absence does not affect the established morph and this is the definition of Independent Traits when we talk about crested geckos.



    Here is a list of Independent traits that will be displayed and explained below:

    -Pinstriping -Dalmatian spots -Fringing -Kneecaps -Portholes -White walls -Furred -Crowned -Reverted -Exaggerated crests -Blushing

    Some are more popular then others. Pinstriping and Dalmatian spots are sometimes thought of as their own morph because of the popularity they have acquired. However, they are still traits and can appear on various morphs without affecting its placement. These traits have evolved into multiple degrees of explanation and we will go into detail with them below.


    Pinstripes:


    What is a Pinstripe?
    A typical pinstripe is a crested gecko that has raised scales, just like their crests but shorter, that run down each side of the dorsal area and connect at the base of the tail. It is a structural addition to the appearance of the gecko.

    Pinstripes are one of the most popular and more attractive traits that comes in a couple different flavors including:

    -Dashed Pinstipes -Partial Pinstripes -Full Pinstripes -Reverse Pinstripes -Phantom Pinstripes -Quad Pinstripes -Solid Back Pinstripes

    Dashed Pinstripes:
    A dashed pinstripe is a gecko with less then 50% pinstriping that includes multiple breaks down the dorsal. A lot of times the breaks occur at the same location on each side of the dorsal giving it a dashed look.


    BY IMPERIALBP AND ROBERTSKITTY

    BY GRUBLET AND PANDAPARADE


    Partial Pinstripes:
    Partial Pinstripes are geckos with pinstriping between the 50% and 99% range. Pinstriping between 50% and 75% is considered Low Percentage and 75% to 99% is considered High Percentage. There are those that fall very close to the low/high percentage division and those will be subjective to the viewer. One way to determine an accurate opinion would be to imagine all the pinstriping without any breaks. Fill in one side of the pinstriping with pieces from the other until it is full. That would be 50% pinning. Then imagine the rest and how much it would fill up on the opposite pinstripe. If it reaches past more then half the dorsal length, it would be a high percentage. If it reaches less then half the dorsal, it would be low pecentage.

    High Percentage:


    BY JENNY AND MELISSA N.

    BY CALIA AND XKATELYNELL

    Low Percentage:


    BY BERTOPIA AND GOTAGECKO

    BY MADDOXDOBES


    Full Pinstripes:
    A full pinstripe is a gecko with 100% pinning down each side of the dorsal that connect at the base of the tail. Even one break in the raised scales would put it into the "high percentage partial pin" catagory.


    BY EMILYLOVESHERPS AND 003MENACE

    BY SUNGMINA AND TALKENLATE 04

    Reverse Pinstripes:
    The reverse pinstripe actually refers to a coloration pattern rather then a structural one. Typically a pinstripe is a raised scale pattern that runs down each side of the dorsal. A reverse pinner has a dark colored stripe running along the outside of the raised scales existing in the upper lateral area. There is no structural difference just a very noticeable color patterned stripe.


    BY DREADYA AND PANDAPARADE

    BY BRANDIEB AND SAINT

    Phantom Pinstripes:
    The phantom pinstripe is a crested gecko that has pinstriping but lacks any white/cream in the dorsal area. The ideal phantom would be a patternless morph with a full pinstripe highlighted in cream. Typically a pinstripe contains pattern in zone D but the phantom does not. There may be a reminiscence of pattern but it should appear "muted" or like it was once there but now only exists in a darker shade of the base pattern. It's important to understand
    the lighter coloration can be found in the pinstripe scales, but not on the dorsum itself.


    BY EMILYLOVESHERPS AND SAINT

    BY JENNY

    Quad-Stripes:
    The quad-striped pinner is a crested gecko that has not only a full pinstripe but a lateral stripe, that is also structural, and exists on the sides of a crested between zones C and D. These are also called "sideburns". It typically runs from about the front leg to the back leg and is raised as much as the pinstripes on the dorsal are.


    BY TALKENLATE04 AND CLEIGHV

    BY MDNGRAIN AND KESTRALSHATTERWIND

    BY PANDAPARADE

    Solid Back Pinstripe:
    A solid back pinner is a crested gecko with full pinstriping and a solid dorsal which contains no pattern or very close to no pattern.


    BY AJROCKS777 AND ALLHALLOWS

    BY BERTOPIA

    Dalmatian Spots:

    What are dalmatian spots?
    They look exactly like what you would see on a Dalmatian dog... Black spots. Well, it’s not quite that easy. They have their own levels of degree and explanation much like the pinstripe. They are little areas of pigment that concentrate the color black in a circle-like pattern.

    Here's a good starting point:

    -Dalmatian spotting -Dalmatian -Super Dalmatian -Big spots -Red Spots -Green spots -Oil spots -phantom spots -Cluster spots

    Below we will go into detail about what is known about this interesting trait.

    Dalmatian spotting:
    When there are a couple dalmatian spots on a gecko but none of them are very significant in size or there are less than 25, it’s called dal spotting. There really isn’t enough to recognize as a trait but there is enough to not leave it unmentioned.


    BY DARKPLATYPUS AND LYLWHITETIGER

    BY THONGWEDGIE

    Dalmatian:
    Many people mistake the term dalmatian as its own morph. Truth is, it’s not. It’s just a very popular independent trait. It is common to refer to a gecko as a dalmatian in conversation but it’s important to realize that 1- it’s not a morph and 2- that is actually is a dalmatian. As mentioned above anything under 25 spots is considered Dalmatian spotting. So remember, 25+ spots is what it take to officially tack on Dalmatian at the end of a morph description.


    BY ENTO890 AND KNUCKLEHEDZ

    BY THONGWEDGIE

    Super Dalmatian:
    When the spots on a dalmatian reach at least 100+, you have a super dalmatian. Typically a descent amount of these spots are also big spots, making for a nice spotty adult.


    BY AQUIRA AND AGUIDINGER

    BY CSLINCA

    Big spots:
    Big spots on a crested gecko are those that appear to be as big a chocolate chip. Maybe slightly smaller or bigger but within that range and either way they are much bigger than the standard dal spot which is more the size of the tip of a pen.


    BY DRAGONLVR AND DARWIN

    BY KNUCKLEHEDZ AND DRAGONLVR

    Red spots:
    When the spots on a dalmatian are red in color. This refers to each spot individually.


    BY DARWIN AND EMILYLOVESHERPS

    BY LIREPTILES AND SHADOWKORIN

    Green Spots:
    When the spots on a dalmatian are green in color. This refers to each spot individually, black spots are black, red are red, and green are green. These are the three colors of spots known today.


    BY EMILYLOVESHERPS AND THONGWEDGIE


    Oil spots:
    Oil spots are like dalmatian spots but much lighter in color. They appear to look like a grease stain on your clothing after you dropped some taco meat on yourself. They are always there but sometimes they are easier to see once the gecko is fired-up. Not much is known really about this trait, or if it really even a trait. It has not been proven but has been seen.


    BY THONGWEDGIE

    Phantom spots:
    Phantom spots are not a darker spot either. They are more of a light grey in color. They tend to appear as the gecko is growing and are not visible unless the gecko is fired up. Like oil spots, not much is known about this trait, or if it even is a trait. It has not been proven but has been seen.


    BY 003MENACE


    BY THONGWEDGIE


    Clusters:
    Clusters are when a dalmation has a group of spots that are tightly grouped together. They sometimes look like one big spot but are really a group of several.


    BY EMILYLOVESHERPS AND GEKOGIRL

    BY THONGWEDGIE

    White Fringing:
    White fringing is when the scales along the back side of the back legs are white. Fringing was present in the first specimens brought to the U.S and can sometimes reach all the way around the back feet.


    BY RIZAROO AND THONGWEDGIE

    BY KATIEAM AND RUBBERDUCKEY273

    Knee Caps:
    Knee caps are when the back legs of crested gecko have what appears to be white knee caps in the area where you would think a knee cap would be. Some specimens have white fringing that wraps all the way around to the knee area where they connect with what appears to be bright white knee pads.


    BY BERTOPIA AND DRAGONLVR

    BY LYLWHITETIGER AND RUBBERDUCKEY273

    Portholes:
    Portholes consist of three white circle-like formations on the lateral areas (sides) of the gecko right between zones C and D, just like the lateral pinstriping. They are very similar to the porthole windows on a boat, which is where the name comes from.


    BY GEKOGIRL AND KATIEAM

    BY MEG90 AND TSUNAMEE

    White Walls:
    The white wall trait is when the lateral areas (zone C & D) are overcome by a white wall of color, totally taking over the base and pattern color traits. This trait is currently being perfected by Matt Parks and is soon to be a popular trait indeed.


    BY ALLHALLOWS AND SUNGMINA

    Furred:
    A furred crested gecko seems to have an extraordinary amount of raised crests that are not within the pinstripe region. They tend to over developed in the dorsal area and are in various spots.


    BY COMET AND TSUNAMEE

    BY RUBBERDUCKEY273 AND THONGWEDGIE

    Crowned:
    Crowned crested geckos have a head length less then 1.3 times the width of the head. Sometimes the head can be so wide it starts to droop off the sides of their head, almost like a dog ear. This does not include the crest sizes or their length.


    BY CREEPSHOW2010 AND TALKENLATE04

    BY LYLWHITETIGER AND MARIGOLD

    BY MONSTER AND TIKI

    Reverted:
    When a gecko had a very narrow head and reduced crest sizes they are considered negative traits and should be culled out of the colony or only kept as pets.

    Exaggerated crests:
    Exaggerated crests are those with exceptional thickness and length. These may or may not be present on a crowned specimen, but they do add to its own unique appearance. At what point does an exaggeration become one that is better then a standard crest is subjective but in the eyes of any experienced keeper can be easily spotted.


    BY EMILYLOVESHERPS AND MONSTER

    BY GZUMAKI AND ZUT

    Blushing:
    Blushing is a very subtle, unique, yet beautiful trait that affects the area right underneath a cresteds lower jaw. The blushing causes this area to become bright pinkish/Red and can happen in any morph.



    BY RUBBERDUCKEY273 AND STACYKINS
    Last edited by crestedkeeper; 07-14-2012 at 03:30 PM.
    STEVEN

  2. The Following 8 Users Say Thank You to crestedkeeper For This Useful Post:

    aalbertson3 (06-12-2012),Brosserew88 (07-16-2012),Dragonborn (12-29-2012),HermesandBruno (10-24-2012),Jennifer Lima Abrams (02-09-2016),JumpinJewels (02-01-2013),Kaitlin Marks-Dubbs (07-19-2013),Rory (11-11-2015)

  3. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    2,149
    Thanks
    122
    Thanked 51 Times in 45 Posts

    Thumbs up

    I have a trait that i would like to be considered to be added to the Independant Trait list , Inner Reverse Pinstriping .
    although i haven't seen any geckos exhibiting the trait as well as she has i have some that have a minimal amount of it showing. Please let me know if you would need more photos to properly depict this trait.

    Here is the gecko not fired up trait not fired up
    Name:  580502_389359087828330_1830941293_n.jpg
Views: 417
Size:  43.6 KB

    Here is the gecko fired up, trait not fired up
    Name:  483290_354004994697073_1179289366_n.jpg
Views: 376
Size:  43.1 KB

    Here are a few of the trait fired up as well as the gecko fired up
    Name:  285769_324437907653782_1957341571_n.jpg
Views: 391
Size:  93.8 KB

    Name:  299883_384959418268297_969125902_n.jpg
Views: 332
Size:  58.4 KB

    Name:  644601_384959544934951_483208001_n.jpg
Views: 343
Size:  64.3 KB

    if need be i have photos of offspring exhibiting this trait as well .

  4. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to 312Herps For This Useful Post:

    Akamaru (11-28-2014),zorbinski (06-16-2013)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •