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Thread: Preventing tail loss

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    Default Preventing tail loss

    Does anyone have advice on how to help your gecko keep its tail? I am new to them and, while I will love mine very much tail or no tail, I would prefer it to keep its tail (they just look more complete that way). Any advice? (I realize pinching/pulling the tail is on the VERY bad idea list, but what else can bring it about?) Thanks.

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    If the gecko is living alone it is very unlikely anything will happen to the tail. It's usually cagemates that do the most damage. If you see bites on the tail, separate them IMMEDIATELY. I didn't once and came home to a missing tail. I mean missing. I think it was eaten...

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    Heavens! That is, truly, a missing tail! I will only have one gecko (that's all my apartment will allow but I am ecstatic to have the one finally!) so the threat of cagemates is nullified. Any tips on handling? Because I am hoping I get a friendly one.

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    Depending on how young your getting them i've had mine hatch out and drop tails because of the mister or because of the vanccume running. Sometimes as old as 3 months. Just handle with care theres nothing you can reallly do to prevent them from dropping there tail if you scare them good enough they will drop it. I do have one gecko thou that you can hang from his tail and do all kids of stuff to him but he's so chill he dosn't care he loves his tail and wouldn never drop it.

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    When you said "sometimes as old as 3 months" were you implying that after 3 months they become less likely to drop their tails? Is there an age that once they reach it they seem more chilled out in that reguard?

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    Theres really nothing you can do to prevent it, some geckos will drop their tail for no reason at all at 3 months or at 3 years. I have only had one drop a tail and that was a cage mate incident. I also have one that has had its tail bitten but only lots the half of it. Some just want to keep their tails no matter what you do and others will just dop it.
    Just handle with care and dont grab at the tail and Im sure it will be just fine.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lynx9 View Post
    When you said "sometimes as old as 3 months" were you implying that after 3 months they become less likely to drop their tails? Is there an age that once they reach it they seem more chilled out in that reguard?
    3 months as in some were 3 months old when I misted and still dropped there tails. Implying that not just hatchlings will drop them when you spray.

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    They seem to get less skittish as they get older. Logically, I would think that would lessen their chances of losing their tails. I don't have any facts to back that up though!

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    Ok. Thanks for all the advice! I guess I'll just do my best and not worry about it. I will be in love with my gecko either way (it's the pinstripe harlequin that Matt just put up recently, it's on the recently sold page now). S/he is gonna be gorgeous either way.

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    A few other suggestions. There is no way to guarentee it won't drop its tail but you can minimize the risk by decreasing stress on the animal. Consider the following:

    a) give it time to settle into its tank before handling it (1 to 2 weeks is usually recommended)

    b) don't handle for too long when you do first begin to handle it

    c) avoid excessive noise (but common sense applies here - they really are fairly tough and shouldn't drop their tails due to noise - avoid blaring music, impact drills, heavy duty construction sounds etc. However, you do hear of stories of tail drop due to vaccuming etc. however I suspect those cases are rare.)

    d) get to know your animal and recognize when it has had enough time out of its tank and then put it back. Mine usually start getting skittish after a prolonged time and you can just tell that they want back in.

    Hope this helps - don't worry too much about tail drop - from what I have read the leading causes are breeding and cage mate issues so you should be fine since you don't have those issues.
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