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Thread: High temps ruined my breeding season?

  1. #11
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    The thing is, it had gotten very hot in my apartment for around 2 months (just now starting to cool down now, but still pretty hot midday-evening) and my females were still laying. They didn't stop. In that link provided, their females stopped. I wonder why mine didn't?

    Yeah, I was initially very frustrated (still pretty frustrated), but now I have kind of lost hope for the season. I'm hoping that our of each lady's 1-2 clutches left, maybe I will get something good, just before I cool, to hold me over until next season. If not, oh well. I'll cool them, fatten them up, and hope for better luck next season in a new apartment! I will definitely buy an A/C next time.

    I just wish I knew what was going on! That's the part that is driving me crazy.

    EDIT:

    Here is some more info:

    The three breeding females are housed together in a large Exo Terra with coco fiber (Eco Earth) as a substrate. They bury their eggs in the coco fiber, I dig them out and put them in the incubators. This was the way I did it with the one female last year, it worked well, and I was kind of afraid to do it differently this season. They don't live with the males, obviously. I just had them housed with the males temporarily (a couple of weeks), but I know for a fact that mating took place in all cases. I didn't want them to have to deal with being harrassed by the males once they starting laying.

    Weights:

    Female one: 30 grams tailless.
    Female two: 30 grams with a tail.
    Female three: Low 30s in grams with a tail.

  2. #12
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    With the methods being used the eggs could be drying out due to the way they are being laid and the incubation method. The holes in the top of the lid are good for breathing but not good for holding moisture. With that method you have to weight the container and add water to bring it back up to where the humidity should be. Add the heat and you might be needing to add water every day.

    I used this method and it did not work for me, every egg dried or molded over and died. I went with the largest rubbermaid container I could find and used the Calcined Clay (Aquatic plant soil or Repashy Superhatch). I did not poke any holes in the top and to make sure that fresh air gets to the eggs I open the lid once or twice a day.

    The way they are being laid it might be hard to keep the soil consistently moist. Papertowel is my substrate and I use a small kritter keeper and put moss all the way to the top and keep it real moist but not puddling up on the bottom of the container. I pull the eggs within an 8 hour period and they all have come out fine from there.

    I picked the lay box method up from Rick Spekner and the incubation method from previous threads on this site. Successfully hatched out 24 last season with two not making it out of the egg. I recommend it
    It's a popcorn season!

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leif View Post
    With the methods being used the eggs could be drying out due to the way they are being laid and the incubation method. The holes in the top of the lid are good for breathing but not good for holding moisture. With that method you have to weight the container and add water to bring it back up to where the humidity should be. Add the heat and you might be needing to add water every day.

    I used this method and it did not work for me, every egg dried or molded over and died. I went with the largest rubbermaid container I could find and used the Calcined Clay (Aquatic plant soil or Repashy Superhatch). I did not poke any holes in the top and to make sure that fresh air gets to the eggs I open the lid once or twice a day.

    The way they are being laid it might be hard to keep the soil consistently moist. Papertowel is my substrate and I use a small kritter keeper and put moss all the way to the top and keep it real moist but not puddling up on the bottom of the container. I pull the eggs within an 8 hour period and they all have come out fine from there.

    I picked the lay box method up from Rick Spekner and the incubation method from previous threads on this site. Successfully hatched out 24 last season with two not making it out of the egg. I recommend it
    Thanks! I will consider this.

    I am definitely a paranoid/anxious type and, when I have eggs incubating, check on them every day or so (including candling, rewetting perlite as necessary, wiping any condensation off of the bottom of the lid, and replacing the eggs). I haven't had any eggs dry out (meaning they haven't shriveled up, which I assume they would do if they dried out). I have, however, had eggs mold, but does that happen due to drying out?

    My incubation method won't work too well when I have a lot of breeding going on, so I may consider taking your advice. I'm just not too convinced that this is the problem here because:

    1. None of my eggs have shriveled up and all have been tended to in an obsessive manner.

    2. All eggs have been undercalcified.

    I like the idea of the small KK for the lay box. Do you know the dimensions of the KK size you described?

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