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Thread: (I need some info) Anyone growing moss with good results in the viv?

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Antoniorocko View Post
    i have some interesting news about the frog moss that i think zoo med sells. i had helped my brother set up a natural tank about 2 months ago and we placed some of that moss around a "pond" in the tank. it seemed to die within a week, but we didnt have a crestie ready to live in it yet so we left it in there to see what would happen. this past weekend i went back home, to bring my brother the crestie that will live in the tank. to my amazement the moss has started to sprout out of the dead plant. we have a light (just a typical reptile light no special UVA/UVB bulb.) that its more or less directly under and other than that it has pretty much been forgotten about. so i wanted to let everyone know about that. maybe try growing it in a seperate tank at first since it looked like crap for a long time. from what i have read and from seeing this tank the moss getting the most light is growing the best, so that may be a factor why alot of peoples moss dies. the moss not getting any direct light did not re-sprout.
    Interesting. I'll see what happends with this. If it fails im gonna get some real live moss and give that a shot. I worry about the crestie getting Sporotrichosis though.
    1 male named Cannoli
    1 female named Cappuccino
    2 eggs incubating

  2. #12
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    thats interesting i never thought about that. i know nothing about Sporotrichosis, are reptiles typically suceptable to it? if anyone has any info please share
    2.1.0 Rhacodactylus Ciliatus Jasper, Taz, Hunter
    0.0.1 Rhacodactylus Chahoua [PI](unnamed)
    1.1.0 Holland lop Marley, Ella

  3. #13
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    I don't understand why you would want moss in the first place...for a number of reasons:

    Moss

    1. unnatural
    2. cannot harbor benificial insects (such as springtails and/or isopods)
    3. cannot harbor beneficial bacteria easily
    4. hard to grow


    Leaf Litter


    1. natural
    3. harbors beneficial insects (such as springtails and/or isopods) very easily
    4. harbors beneficial bacteria very easily
    5. decaying leaves are excellant for plants

    The pros of leaves far outweigh the cons of moss.

    As for Sporotrichosis, it is extremely rare, and though i'm sure it can infect reptiles, I have heard no case of said infection ever occuring (in reptiles).
    Tyler

    Rhacodactylus ciliatus - 1.2.15.4
    Felis domesticus - 0.1.0

  4. #14
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    My guess would be more of an aesthetic appeal, than having a purpose thats why I like it I had leaf litter going for a while in my natural cage, but ended up taking it out because I prefer the plain look of dirt over crushed leaves.
    --Brian--

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    Quote Originally Posted by crazycresteds View Post
    I don't understand why you would want moss in the first place...for a number of reasons:

    Moss

    1. unnatural -------->***How is moss unnatural??***
    2. cannot harbor benificial insects (such as springtails and/or isopods)
    3. cannot harbor beneficial bacteria easily
    4. hard to grow


    Leaf Litter


    1. natural
    3. harbors beneficial insects (such as springtails and/or isopods) very easily
    4. harbors beneficial bacteria very easily
    5. decaying leaves are excellant for plants

    The pros of leaves far outweigh the cons of moss.

    As for Sporotrichosis, it is extremely rare, and though i'm sure it can infect reptiles, I have heard no case of said infection ever occuring (in reptiles).
    The leaves can get real funky after some time. Moss smells great. fresh and clean. As far as dirt turning. I do it my self once a month. I dont want to introduce insects into the viv via leaf litter. I would be too worried of a population explosion in such as small environment and introducing unwanted insects.

    Ever have Isopods go crazy in your viv? They multiply fast.

    Also when you say leaf litter. Do you mean you grab leaf litter from around your home? If so. Is that a smart think to do?

    Thanks!
    CB
    1 male named Cannoli
    1 female named Cappuccino
    2 eggs incubating

  6. #16
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    Depending on if you use chemicals around your home or if any of the surrounding properties do, than you should be able to just grab leaves from the ground (as long as your sure there arnt any chemicals)
    --Brian--

  7. #17
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    Well, I usually just grab a bunch of magnolia leaves from my yard. I had a really bad fungus gnat problem once...which i'm almost positive came from the leaves, since I had not sanitized them first. So yes, I would recommend letting them sit in some hot water for an hour or so to get all of the loose insects off of the leaves, then throw them in the oven at 300-350 degrees until they are dried (which usually takes about 30 mins or so....or less). I would then put them into a zip lock bag and put them in a freezer for a couple days...that should do the trick-haha. Most people just put them in the oven for a while and use them straight after that, but I made sure to take extra precautions since those fungus gnats were a SOB.

    I should have made myself clearer before. Leaf litter is excellent AFTER you sanitize it. Things like isopods and springs I would just add by them selves afterwards.

    The only time I wouldn't sanitize it is if it was for really small herps...like let's say dart frogs for example. They would eat any of the insects on the leaves. And even if you had a gnat bloom, they would probably decimate that population also...so I wouldn't worry about it with them, but for larger herps...like Rhacs who don't eat smaller things like that...that's when I would sanitize everything.

    As for isopods, your geckos may go at them as an extra snack, especially younger geckos, so I doubt the population would sky rocket out of control. For adults however, they probably won't go for the isopods...unless you had the "millipede isopod" kind. I'm not sure on their scientific name, but they generally are bigger than the normal isopods you would find under rocks and have more body sections and legs.......I'm probably making no sense here, but the point is that there is a species that get bigger than normal isopods that the cresteds may go after.

    If there is an isopods boom and you cannot control the population...I don't see how that would be a problem, since they eat dead plants and other organic matter and are a beneficial insect. Usually the population balances itself out after a few weeks.

    Same goes for springtails. They eat mold and other organic items. There may be a great number of them, but they aren't anything "bad".

    You may even find mites in your viv. These are't the ones that affect animals. They probably came in on either your soil, plants/potting soil, or leaves.

    The only "pests" that you may not want that tI can think of off of the top of my head are fungus gnats, fruit flies, spiders (though this would be rare and even if you did get a couple spiders, odds are they wuld probably starve and die out), mites that eat springtails (since you want springs to eat decomposing material), mites that affect herps.............and nemertions (sp?)...they are a predatory insect.
    Tyler

    Rhacodactylus ciliatus - 1.2.15.4
    Felis domesticus - 0.1.0

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