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Gregg M
11-25-2006, 11:50 AM
This brings me up to a 1.3 group of the awesome little vipers....

Enjoy the picture...
http://206.225.81.33/photopost/data/520/cerataphora.JPG

DDReptiles
11-25-2006, 12:59 PM
Pretty sweet, this local snake breeder (friend) here just got a trio of bush vipers that are awesome!!

ReptileChick
11-25-2006, 02:39 PM
*drool* very cool!

Gregg M
11-26-2006, 05:09 PM
Thanks... Here are a few more pics... These are 3 different animals...
http://206.225.81.33/photopost/data/520/cerataphora4.JPG

http://206.225.81.33/photopost/data/520/cerataphora2.JPG

http://206.225.81.33/photopost/data/520/cerataphora3.JPG

ReptileChick
11-26-2006, 08:31 PM
Very pretty. Are they hard to care for?

-Katie-

cornsnake
11-26-2006, 09:13 PM
Very pretty. Are they hard to care for?

-Katie-

i would not reccomend them to anyone not familier and experiance around venomous snakes. lol.

very nice looking bush vipers, they are the one venomous snake i would consider keeping, other than panamint rattlers. but than again i dont plan on keeping any venomous snakes other than hognoses, and ringnecks lol.
corey

ReptileChick
11-26-2006, 09:34 PM
I wasn't looking into any now...but maybe in the future. What would you suggest as a starter venomous snake?

cornsnake
11-26-2006, 10:24 PM
alot of time spent learning how to properly handle venomous snakes is what i would do, than perhaps look into keeping them, but i wont be keeping anything "front fanged" so i think greg M is the man on this forum to ask.
and greg are you on the venomdoc.com forum?
corey

DDReptiles
11-26-2006, 10:27 PM
What would you suggest as a starter venomous snake?


If you have to ask this.....then your not ready ;) You will know when your ready.

Gregg M
11-26-2006, 10:53 PM
Very pretty. Are they hard to care for?

-Katie-

Hi Katie.
They are not particularly hard to keep as long as you keep them correctly... High humidity and cool temps... Diet is most important... Most people believe that mice are good for any snake but the fact is, rodents make up a very small part of Atheris cerataphoras diet... They mainly eat frogs in the wild...

When given a staple diet of rodents, Atheris cerataphora will have liver problems... This usually leads to death...

My Atheris are fed mostly green tree or reed frogs (sorry frog lovers) and are offered pinkies every once in a while just to vary their diet a bit...

As mentioned Atheris do not make good first venomous... Reason being is that there is no antivenin for this family of vipers... It was once believed that Atheris venom was not very potent and was harmless to humans... However it is being made quite clear that the opposite is true... Some Atheris are very venomous and have/can/will cause human fatalities...

As far as a starter venomous snake goes, alot of people will say "go with a copperhead" or some other native species on the lower end of the toxicity scale... But I usually say start with what you want to keep... Why get a copperhead if you have no interest in keeping them??? You should train with someone who is experienced with hots if you can... The real answer to that question is, "there is no good starter hot"... All venomous snakes have the ablility to kill you if it bites you... Getting into venomous reptiles is a huge responsiblity...

Corey,
I do frequent venomdoc... Its a cool site....

cornsnake
11-26-2006, 11:13 PM
excellant advice Gregg.
i enjoy reading and trying to comprehend all of the toxicology type things that dr. frye has written, i dont really post, i think i have like 3 or 4 times lol, but i enjoy reading the threads and such. i like venomous snakes, and i enjoy finding them in the field and such.. and did i ever post the pic of the massuaga i found in south padre island. such a cool snake, and really "calm" it didnt rattle its little tail or strike at me.
corey

Bill22
11-26-2006, 11:29 PM
I would like to oneday get a nice looking snake as that one, but not looking for any thing thats going to hurt me some thing that isnt venomus! any suggestions

cml3.0
11-26-2006, 11:43 PM
Wow they are beauties!! I just love the head structure on them, and of course the color!!!

BadAssHerps
12-04-2006, 11:40 AM
I really like the rough scaled bush vipers aka the hairy bush viper. Does anyone know someone who keeps them?
-Eli

ReptileChick
12-04-2006, 12:18 PM
Yeah, don't plan on anything soon at all. Right now I don't have any snakes, but used to. My mom used to have a little hognose which I loved. I don't think my boyfriend would like me having anything that could kill me in the house, hehe. I plan on working with all reptiles in the future. I want to go out and study them in their natural habitat. Do things like Steve Irwin did (R.I.P.). First things first, though, study up. Maybe one day I could get into some venomous species. Very beautiful snakes and thanks for the advice Gregg!

-Katie-

Gregg M
12-04-2006, 10:34 PM
I really like the rough scaled bush vipers aka the hairy bush viper. Does anyone know someone who keeps them?
-Eli

Actually the rough scaled bush viper is Atheris squamigera... The hairy bush viper is Atheris hispida...

Atheris hispida are very difficult to maintain in captivity due in part to their dietary preference... They are slug eaters and rodent based diets will kill them...

Most of the imports that come in to the Country wind up dieing, partly because they are loaded with lungworm and other nasty parasites that are not easily treated... The other part is due to improper husbandry and diet...

There is a small number of keeper doing anything with Atheris as an entire species... Atheris hispida are even less common in collections...

However, I do know someone who is keeping two alive right now...

firecrested
12-23-2006, 10:28 PM
Yeah, don't plan on anything soon at all. Right now I don't have any snakes, but used to. My mom used to have a little hognose which I loved. I don't think my boyfriend would like me having anything that could kill me in the house, hehe. I plan on working with all reptiles in the future. I want to go out and study them in their natural habitat. Do things like Steve Irwin did (R.I.P.). First things first, though, study up. Maybe one day I could get into some venomous species. Very beautiful snakes and thanks for the advice Gregg!

-Katie-

I would keep some "aggressive" non venomous for a while first. Like some w.c. amazon tree boas, to get use to something that will bite. I had non venomous snakes for about 6-7 years before I got my first.

There's really no answer to "What's a good starter venomous snake". Like Greg said, they all wil bite. My first venomous snakes would definately not be on the top 10 list for a beginner (eastern d-back and w.a. gaboon viper). The biggest thing is to be experienced enough with snakes so you have some idea about them and just have common sense, like if it doesnt eat dont try to take the mouse/rat out with your hands;), I have seen someone try that#-o

Also, I would call around and see if anyone has antivenom for the snake you want, because even the very experienced keepers are bitten sometimes. but Tennessee has strict rules about venomous, you will have to get a license first and that wont be easy.

DDReptiles
12-24-2006, 12:02 AM
I would keep some "aggressive" non venomous for a while first.

Coachwhips are great snakes to train with

gsreptiles
12-24-2006, 11:56 AM
yes venomdoc is a great forum for info I have been there for like 3 years

ReptileChick
12-24-2006, 08:43 PM
Thanks everyone! I've been interested in getting a tree boa anyway. They are gorgeous. Just not yet. Again, thanks!

Eriks Reptiles
12-24-2006, 10:19 PM
With venomous the most important rule that I have been taught was to always put the hand that isn’t using the snake hook in your pocket or behind your back when you first start working with venomous ... Just because when "hooking" a venomous there is a chance that they could fall off (especially small species, or ground dwellers that aren’t used to being in the air) ... And a lot of times people that are new to venomous use their other hand to try and grab the falling snake ( just out of instinct: try to catch what’s falling) and get bit.. Because if something was falling I would always reach out to grab it but with venomous, you probably don’t want to reach out and grab it, if you know what I mean!!

Also when working with arboreal venomous species always use two hooks.. They can climb right up one hook to your hand quite quickly and an extra hook in the other hand helps out A LOT!! If you can't get the snake off the hook its climbing you can always just set that hook on the ground and have an extra hook so that you’re still in control of the snake.

So that’s how I learned and that’s what I practiced.

PS: Beautiful female Greg!!!

Thanks Erik

TommyS.
03-04-2007, 06:44 AM
you see...in italy we don't have problems in keeping venomous snakes...no problems at all...they're forbidden:roll: